School Resources for Teachers and Students

Raul M. Rojas, Director, Public Works
The information on this page is geared to students and teachers. Explore the following panels to find activities, projects and resources to help our creeks. Also included are links to other agencies' educational websites for further learning exploration.

 

Watershed and Creek Maps

Maps

To find out where your school is located with respect to a creek or bay please view one of the following maps:

Map of East Marin Schools and Creeks
Map of West Marin Schools and Creeks

Watershed Descriptions

Find out how watersheds work, their history and what is in place today in Marin. Particularly good for junior high and high school students seeking more in-depth knowledge of watersheds.

Watershed Groups

To discover what community members are doing in a creek near you contact a local Creek Group.

Activities and Projects

STRAW Project for all ages of students

Students and Teachers restoring A Watershed (STRAW) is a program that educates Marin County students that we all live in a watershed, the importance of riparian habitat and it's effects on stream health, stormwater pollution prevention, and how they can make a difference. The two part program starts with in class presentations followed by a hands-on restoration day in a local creek. Students remove non-native invasive species, plant natives, and observe local riparian habitat. For examples of previous activities see prior annual reports.

Fish Friendly Car Wash Kit for High School Students

(Used for Fundraising Events)

If you plan to hold a car wash fundraiser, borrow a Fish-Friendly Car Wash kit from MCSTOPPP! The kit contains everything you need to hold a car wash without hurting the fish.

Marking Storm Drains: Drains to Creeks or Bay

One of the best reminders about not allowing trash, or other debris, to enter a storm drain is through placing storm drain markers near the drain. If you'd like to obtain markers for the storm drains around your school, contact the stormwater program manager in your City or Town to supply you with the markers.

Watershed Diorama

Group of kids doing craft projects.A 3x4 foot model of a community, complete with working storm drains and a wastewater-treatment plant. This is a good tool for teaching about how pollutants get into local creeks. Students use spray bottles to learn how pollutants get washed into local waterways after a rainstorm, by over watering lawns, or by washing cars. Email MCSTOPPP or call us at (415) 473-3202 regarding availability.

Sea-level Rise for High School Students

The Game of Floods was developed as a public education activity on sea level rise adaptation for high school students and community members. It is currently used in Marin County high schools through the Youth Exploring Sea-level rise Science (YESS) program. The activity includes traditional flood protection measures such as levees and seawalls; green infrastructure approaches including horizontal levees, wetland restorations, and beach nourishment; and policy/zoning changes. The Game of Floods is a small group activity, with 4-6 participants tasked with developing a vision for Marin Island 2050, a hypothetical landscape that highlights the conditions that will be experienced in Marin in coming years with sea level rise and increased storm impacts causing the loss or deterioration of homes, community facilities, roads, agricultural land, beaches, wetlands, lagoons, and other resources. To start the game, participants are given a lesson with an game board, participants take turns championing assets they value and proposing strategies to protect these sites from sea level rise and storm impacts. The game creates a lively interaction between participants, heightening awareness of the challenges of planning for sea level rise. The game concludes with group discussion to obtain consensus for a vision which protects critical assets, while maximizing ecosystems benefits through wetland restoration and other living shoreline approaches. Community Development Agency staff can provide the board and materials to any local jurisdiction, non-profit, or other group interested in hosting an event, or game night.

For more information, contact the Marin Sea Level Rise Team.

Websites on Watersheds and the Water Cycle

Watersheds in Marin County

A watershed is all of the land that drains to a particular stream, river, or bay. All land, from the wildest preserve to the most densely developed urban neighborhood, is part of a watershed. Learn more about your watershed using the Creeks and Watersheds Interactive Map.

Healthy watersheds work hard and provide food and fiber, clean water, and habitat for native plants and animals. They move sediment from the mountains to the beaches and bays, sorting it along the way to create diverse landscapes and habitats. They cycle nutrients and convert them into forms that living organisms can use. They purify and store water, and then meter its release into streams to reduce flooding and damaging erosion in the winter and to sustain flows and cool temperatures during the dry season. They even affect air quality by absorbing pollutants and greenhouse gases. Well-functioning watersheds are more resilient to natural and human-induced disturbances than highly-impacted watersheds.

Plants and Wildlife in Marin's Watersheds range from red-tailed hawks and mountain lions on the slopes of Mount Tam to oysters and harbor seals in the bays and on the coast. A diversity of wildlife inhabits Marin County. Discover more about Plants and Wildlife in Marin's Watersheds that depend on healthy watersheds to survive.

Climate Change projections predict a mean sea level rise of approximately a meter by 2100 which will lead to increased flooding at lower elevations. Climate change projections also include fluctuations in temperature, the potential for more frequent periods of drought, and the likelihood of intense storm events happening more often. These changes are likely to have an impact on riparian vegetation composition and density, as well as the frequency and erosive power of high flow events. Explore the Marin Sea Level Rise page to learn more. For an interactive game see "The Game of Floods" a public education activity on sea level rise developed for high school students and community members. The activity includes traditional flood protection measures such as levees and seawalls; green infrastructure approaches including horizontal levees, wetland restorations, and beach nourishment; and policy/zoning changes. The Community Development Agency staff can provide the board and materials to any local jurisdiction, non-profit, or other group interested in hosting an event, or game night. For more information, contact the Marin Sea Level Rise Team.

Water Cycles from other agencies and educational institutions

Water flowing through our watersheds returns through the process of the water cycle. Earth recycles the limited supply of water in an endless exchange through evaporation, condensation, precipitation and collection. Explore the follow websites to discover more.

Water Cycle Video - NOAA National Oceanic and Atmosphere Administration

Interactive Water Cycle - United States Geological Survey USGS

Interactive water Cycle - Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Thirstin’s Water Cycle EPA - Animated water cycle

Water cycle with activities on Evaporation, Precipitation, Saturation, etc - Washington State University

The Water Cycle and earth observations - National Aeronautics and Space Administration NASA Earth Observatory

Description of the Hydrologic Cycle - NOAA Northwest River Forecast Center provides explanations of evaporation, condensation, precipitation, interception, infiltration, percolation, transpiration, runoff, and storage Water as a resource

Games, Activities, and Illustrations - US EPA Kid's Stuff page for Grades K - 12

Publications

Available Publications

  • Activity Book - Available for grades 3-5, this booklet offers tips kids can take to protect the environment. 
  • Pest or Pal? – A fun activity guide for grades 2 - 5. Learn about the wonderful world of bugs and plants - and find out if they are a "friend" or a "foe". 
  • Protect Our Water and Wildlife! Coloring Book:  - This coloring book is most useful for grades K-2. Discusses actions kids can take to protect local waterways.
  • Growing Gardens from Garbage   - A guide to composting with food scraps and yard waste. Discusses compost systems and worm bins, and provides current resources.
  • Composting Across the Curriculum – Because of ongoing interest in this publication that was originally published in 1993, we have scanned the first 90 pages for your use. The Appendices were left out since they have not been updated.