Marin County Parks and Open Space Department

Road & Trail System Designation

Region 4 Designation 

After careful evaluation of public comments, the Marin County Open Space District has approved the Region 4 road and trail designation. The Region 4 designation workshop was held on May 13, 2017, with draft maps showing relatively few changes to the existing signed and maintained road and trail network. Sixty members of the public attended the meeting and offered comments. Following the workshop, the public had an opportunity to view and comment on the proposed road and trail system for Region 4. Seventy-five public comments were received.

Based on the Road & Trail Management Plan, the approved designation is the foundation for a more sustainable, environmentally sound, and enjoyable trail system in Region 4 that will evolve over time. Region 4 is located in the northern section of Marin county. This region consists of six preserves totaling 2,874 acres. It includes Deer Island, Indian Tree, Little Mountain, Mount Burdell, Rush Creek, and Verissimo Hill Preserves. Mount Burdell Preserve is the largest preserve in this region (1,627 acres), followed by Rush Creek (522 acres), and Indian Tree (242 acres). Region Four includes the oak-studded Mount Burdell 1,558 feet summit,  Rush Creek Preserve adjacent to Bahia wetlands, and Indian Tree preserve's oak, bay, and madrone forests, with clusters of massive redwoods.

Designation Process

Consistent with the Road and Trail Management Plan's Policy SW.2: System Roads and Trails (page 4-14), the MCOSD will designate a system of roads and trails in all existing and new open space preserves through a collaborative public process. Those roads and trails eligible for consideration as part of the system must have been constructed as of November 2011. The designation of a formal road and trail system is proceeding on a regional basis. For planning purposes, the RTMP divides the 34 preserves into six regions. Maps are posted to this page as they become available following public outreach in each region.

There are two types of system designation maps and these maps will be updated over time as implemented RTMP projects add to or alter the system, or allow for changes in the permitted uses of individual roads and trails.

  • Maps showing the location and status of designated roads and trails
  • Maps showing the permitted uses of the designated roads and trails
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Projects Proposed by the Public

UPDATED: OCTOBER 18, 2017

The proposed road and trail project list for Regions 1, 2, and 3 is now available:

The Road and Trail Management Plan (RTMP) describes the decision-making process the MCOSD uses to determine designation, management, and maintenance of the road and trail system. Road and trail projects proposed by the public are screened and evaluated based on these primary objectives of the RTMP:

  • Achieve continuous measurable reductions in physical and environmental impacts associated with the road and trail network.
  • Enhance visitor experience and safety.

The public may participate in identifying potential projects by using this form.

Individuals, organizations, trail user groups, and others interested in the process should read RTMP chapter 5 for a complete description of the project submission framework and timing. Decision making is conducted in a transparent and collaborative manner, subject to the laws, policies, and goals outlined in the RTMP.

For More Information

Contact Chief of Planning & Acquisition Program Manager Carl Somers at (415) 473-2820 for more information. If you would like to subscribe to this page and receive updates when we add maps and information please send us an email and we'll add you to our list.


Regions

Region 1 - Six Preserves in the Southeastern Portion of the County

SUBMIT YOUR ROAD AND TRAIL PROJECT PROPOSAL USING OUR PROPOSAL FORM

The Region 1 Designation Workshop was held on March 22, 2015. Following the workshop, the public had an opportunity to submit proposals for road and trail projects in Region 1. An initial list of Region 1 proposed projects is available. Inclusion of a proposed project on this list, even when highly ranked, does not guarantee that a project will be selected for implementation in the near or long term. This list will be updated from time to time as new proposals are received and processed.

Region 1 is located in the southeastern portion of Marin County. This region consists of six open space preserves totaling approximately 1,197 acres. It includes Baltimore Canyon, King Mountain, Blithedale Summit, Camino Alto, Alto Bowl, and Horse Hill Preserves. The largest preserves are Blithedale Summit (640 acres), Baltimore Canyon (193 acres), and Camino Alto (170 acres). Region 1 contains approximately 34 miles of roads and trails.

This region is near Mount Tamalpais State Park, with the public lands of Golden Gate National Recreation Area to the west. Public lands and private residences within Homestead Valley are located to the south. Piper Park, U.S. Highway 101, and residential areas are located to the east. Hal Brown Park, the College of Marin, and residences are located to the north. Adjacent land uses within 1/4 mile of the MCOSD roads and trails within region 1 include residential use (1,491 acres, or 66.5% of adjacent acreage), other open space (412 acres, or 18.3%), public or quasi-public use (286 acres, or 12.7%), and commercial/mixed uses (53 acres, or 2.3%).

Final Designation Map thumbnail

Designation Map (Full-sized Image) - This map shows designated roads and trails from Region One of the Road and Trail Management Plan. Preserves in Region One include Blithedale Summit, Baltimore Canyon, King Mountain, Alto Bowl, Horse Hill, and Camino Alto. If you need more information about the information in this map email Jon Campo.

Final Use Map thumbnail

Use Map (Full-sized Image) - This map shows designated use, for hikers, cyclists, and equestrians, on Region One roads and trails. Preserves in Region One include Blithedale Summit, Baltimore Canyon, King Mountain, Alto Bowl, Horse Hill, and Camino Alto. If you need more information about the information in this map email Jon Campo.


Region 2 - Seven Preserves in the Western Portion of the County

SUBMIT YOUR ROAD AND TRAIL PROJECT PROPOSAL USING OUR PROPOSAL FORM

The Region 2 Designation Workshop was held on October 3, 2015. Following the workshop, the public had an opportunity to view and comment on the proposed road and trail system for Region 2. Formal road and trail project proposals may be submitted at any time. Those proposals received through August 2016 will be evaluated and considering in the annual budget development process for Fiscal Year 2016 – 2017.

Region 2 is located near the Town of Fairfax. This region consists of seven preserves totaling 3,607 acres. It includes French Ranch, Maurice Thorner Memorial, Roy’s Redwoods, Gary Giacomini, Loma Alta, White Hill, and Cascade Canyon Preserves. The Gary Giacomini Preserve is the largest preserve in this region (1,499.83 acres), followed by Loma Alta (509 acres), and Cascade Canyon (504 acres). Region 2 contains approximately 52 miles of roads and trails, more than any of the other regions.

The Gary Giacomini and Cascade Canyon Preserves serve as gateways to lands of the Marin Municipal Water District. Samuel P. Taylor State Park is also located less than one mile west of Gary Giacomini Preserve. Other adjacent land uses include residences along Sir Francis Drake Boulevard. The Gary Giacomini Preserve is located to the south of Sir Francis Drake Boulevard, and the French Ranch, Maurice Thorner Memorial, and Roy’s Redwoods Preserves are located north of this roadway. The Spirit Rock Meditation Center is located to the east of Roy’s Redwoods Preserve. Camp Tamarancho, managed by the Marin Council of Boy Scouts of America, is situated directly north of Cascade Canyon Preserve. Large ranches and scattered residences are located east of the Loma Alta, White Hill, and Cascade Canyon Preserves.

Region 2 Final Designation Map

Designation Map (Full-sized Image) - This map shows designated roads and trails in Region Two of the Road and Trail Management Plan. Preserves in Region Two include French Ranch, Maurice Thorner Memorial, Roy’s Redwoods, Gary Giacomini, Loma Alta, White Hill, and Cascade Canyon. If you need more information about the information in this map email Jon Campo.


Region 2 Final Use Map

Use Map (Full-sized Image) - This map shows designated use, for hikers, cyclists, and equestrians, on Region Two roads and trails. Preserves in Region Two include French Ranch, Maurice Thorner Memorial, Roy’s Redwoods, Gary Giacomini, Loma Alta, White Hill, and Cascade Canyon. If you need more information about the information in this map email Jon Campo.


Region 3 - Five Preserves in the Middle of the County, West of Ignacio and Marinwood

SUBMIT YOUR ROAD AND TRAIL PROJECT PROPOSAL USING OUR PROPOSAL FORM

In August 2016 the MCOSD presented a draft of the Region 3 road and trail designation for open space preserves, including Lucas Valley, Loma Verde, Pacheco Valle, Ignacio Valley, and Indian Valley. Following a careful evaluation of public comments, the MCOSD approved the Region 3 designation.

Region 3 is located in the middle of Marin County, west of the Ignacio and Marinwood communities. This region consists of five preserves totaling 3,537 acres. It includes the Lucas Valley, Indian Valley, Ignacio Valley, Pacheco Valle, and Loma Verde Preserves. Lucas Valley is the largest preserve in this region (1,271 acres), followed by Ignacio Valley (991 acres), Indian Valley (558 acres) and Loma Verde (320 acres). Region 3 contains approximately 30 miles of roads and trails.

This region is surrounded by varying land uses, including large private ranches to the west of the region, and between the Lucas Valley and Indian Valley Preserves. Lands managed by the Marinwood Community Service District are located to the east of the Lucas Valley Preserve and to the south of the Ignacio Valley and Pacheco Valle Preserves. Indian Valley College is located to the northeast of the Indian Valley Preserve. Residences are located to the north of the Ignacio Valley, Pacheco Valle, and Loma Verde Preserves, and to the south of the Lucas Valley Preserve.

Region 3 Designation Map

Designation Map (Full-sized Image) - This map shows designated roads and trails in Region Three of the Road and Trail Management Plan. Preserves in Region Three include Lucas Valley, Indian Valley, Ignacio Valley, Pacheco Valle, and Loma Verde. If you need more information about the information in this map email Jon Campo.


Region 3 Use Map

Use Map (Full-sized Image) - This map shows designated use, for hikers, cyclists, and equestrians, on Region Three roads and trails. Preserves in Region Three include Lucas Valley, Indian Valley, Ignacio Valley, Pacheco Valle, and Loma Verden. If you need more information about the information in this map email Jon Campo.


Region 4 - Six Preserves in the Northern End of the County Near the City of Novato

SUBMIT YOUR ROAD AND TRAIL PROJECT PROPOSAL USING OUR PROPOSAL FORM

Region 4 is located toward the northern end of Marin County near the City of Novato. It is the northernmost of the six regions. The region consists of six preserves totaling 2,873 acres. It includes the Mount Burdell, Little Mountain, Verissimo Hills, Indian Tree, Rush Creek, and Deer Island Preserves. Mount Burdell is the largest preserve in Region 4 (1,627 acres), followed by Rush Creek (522 acres), Indian Tree (242 acres), and Little Mountain (214 acres). Region 4 contains 40 miles of roads and trails, second only to Region 1.

Olompali State Historic Park is located to the north of Mount Burdell Preserve, and U.S. 101 is located east of Mount Burdell Preserve. The Rush Creek Marsh and Petaluma Marsh Wildlife Refuges, managed by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, are located north of the Rush Creek Preserve. Region 4 is the only region where roads and trails are located near rural residential lands as designated by the Marin Countywide Plan.

Region 4 Designation Map

Designation Map (Full-sized Image) - This map shows designated roads and trails in Region Four of the Road and Trail Management Plan. Preserves in Region Four include Deer Island, Indian Tree, Little Mountain, Mount Burdell, Rush Creek, and Verissimo Hill. If you need more information about the information in this map email Carl Somers.

Region 4 Use Map

Use Map (Full-sized Image)- This map shows designated use, for hikers, cyclists, and equestrians, on Region Four roads and trails. Preserves in Region Four include Deer Island, Indian Tree, Little Mountain, Mount Burdell, Rush Creek, and Verissimo Hill. If you need more information about the information in this map email Carl Somers.


Region 5 - Five Preserves in the Center of the County North of the City of San Anselmo

Region 5 is located north of the City of San Anselmo in the center of Marin County, east of Region 2 and south of Region 3. The region consists of five preserves totaling 1,602 acres, including Bald Hill, San Pedro Mountain, Terra Linda/Sleepy Hollow Divide, Santa Margarita Island, and Santa Venetia Marsh. The Terra Linda/Sleepy Hollow Divide Preserve is the largest in this region (1,172 acres), followed by San Pedro Mountain (358 acres) and Santa Venetia (33 acres). Region 5 contains 22 miles of roads and trails; it is the second lowest in mileage of the six regions.

The Terra Linda/Sleepy Hollow Divide Preserve is located south of Lucas Valley Road and extends in a southerly direction towards Sir Francis Drake Boulevard. Residential areas surround the Terra Linda/Sleepy Hollow Divide Preserve. The Bald Hill Preserve is located southwest of Terra Linda/Sleepy Hollow Divide and abuts Marin Municipal Water District land to the west. The San Pedro Mountain Preserve is located east of the Marin County Civic Center, and is adjacent to Harry Barbier City Park and China Camp State Park to the east.


Region 6 - Five Preserves in the Remote Southwestern and Southeastern Ends of the County

Region 6 is the southernmost of the six regions. The region includes a remote preserve on the coast (Bolinas Lagoon), and in the most eastern portion of the county on the Tiburon Peninsula (Old Saint Hilary’s). The region consists of four preserves totaling 1,687 acres. It includes the Bolinas Lagoon, Bothin Marsh, Old Saint Hilary’s, and Ring Mountain. Region 6 also includes Strawberry shoreline and various water lots totaling about 550 acres that extend as far north as San Rafael; this acreage is not included in the total of 1,687 acres for the region. Bolinas Lagoon is the largest preserve within Region 6, at approximately 1,077 acres. Most of Bolinas Lagoon is coastal wetlands. Ring Mountain is the next largest (367 acres), followed by Old Saint Hilary’s (122 acres). Most of the preserves in this region are near San Francisco Bay or the Pacific Ocean. Region 6 contains only 9 miles of road and trails, the lowest in mileage of all regions.

Golden Gate National Recreation Area is located to the east and south of the Bolinas Lagoon Preserve. Ring Mountain Preserve is surrounded by residences and near the Corte Madera Ecological Reserve to the north.


System Designations