Status of Programs

Community Development Agency

State law requires each jurisdiction to address how it will satisfy the objectives for new residential units by income level as represented by the Regional Housing Needs Allocation (RHNA). Means of achieving the development of these units are outlined through policies and programs in the Housing Element. Marin County’s 2015-2023 Housing Element establishes an action plan that details the actions, or programs, that will help us meet our housing needs. For each program, the action plan must identify the agency responsible and the timeframe for implementation.

The immediate need for the County to implement policies and programs that enable us to reach our Housing Element Objectives and Policies is clearly reflected in both local conversations and Statewide legislation about the current housing market and growing affordable housing crisis.

 

Housing Goal 1: Use Land Efficiently

Use Marin's land efficiently to meet housing needs and to implement smart and sustainable development principles.

Policies

Policy 1.1 Land Use

Enact policies that encourage efficient land use regulations which foster a range of housing types in our community.

Policy 1.2 Housing Sites

Recognize developable land as a scarce community resource. Protect and strive to expand the supply and residential capacity of housing sites, particularly for lower income households.

Policy 1.3 Development Certainty

Promote development certainty and minimize discretionary review for affordable and special needs housing through amendments to the Development Code.

Policy 1.4 Design, Sustainability, and Flexibility

Enact programs that facilitate well designed, energy efficient development and flexibility of standards to encourage outstanding projects.

Programs

Program 1.a - Establish Minimum Densities on Housing Element Sites

Objective: Preserve the development capacity for sites included on the Site Inventory list.
Schedule: 2015
Status:

2018

(Complete.) Planners routinely consult a Housing Element layer in the County’s Geographic Information Systems (GIS) application for planning and land management; the Housing Element layer identifies the location of and expresses minimum densities for sites listed in the Site Inventory.

2017

(Complete.) Planners routinely consult a Housing Element layer in the County’s GIS application for planning and land management; the Housing Element layer identities the location of and expresses minimum densities for sites listed in the Site Inventory.

2016

Currently implementing.

2015

Currently implementing.

Program 1.b - Evaluate Multifamily Land use Designations

Objective: Increase capacity for affordable and multifamily housing development; zone lands appropriately; implement Countywide Plan.
Schedule: 2016
Status:

2018

(In progress.) This program was previously postponed pending completion of the County’s Assessment of Fair Housing with the intent to incorporate the research and findings of that assessment into the evaluation of multi-family land use designations. Given the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development decision to delay implementation of the Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing rule for an indeterminate period, staff have elected to proceed with this program ahead of the Assessment of Fair Housing.

Staff anticipate presentation of the Multi-Family Land Use Designation and Zoning Analysis Report and Multi-Family Zoning GIS Map to the Board of Supervisors and Community Development Agency (CDA) managers in the summer of 2019.

2017

(Postponed.) Program is postponed until approximately 2020 to combine implementation with research and findings from the County's Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing (AFFH) analysis which has been deferred by HUD.

2016

Not started.

2015

Not started.

Program 1.c - Evaluate the Housing overlay Designation

Objective: Improve opportunities for multifamily, workforce housing.
Schedule: 2016
Status:

2018

(Partially implemented.) Achievement of this program is contingent upon an update to the General Plan. Staff anticipate the initiation of that update in late 2019 or early 2020.   

2017

(Partially implemented.) In early 2017, Housing and Federal Grants Division staff convened a working group of industry experts to evaluate ways to make the policy more effective. Staff presented their deliberations and recommendations to the Board of Supervisors on August 1, 2017. The Board requested that staff return to further workshop the working group findings however, 2017 State housing legislation may render such a workshop unnecessary. Staff are evaluating that legislation to determine if this program is accomplished by the incentives and streamlining procedures identified therein.

2016

Initiated.

2015

Not started.

Program 1.d - Study Ministerial Review for Affordable Housing

Objective: Facilitate the development of affordable housing.
Schedule: 2020
Status:

2018

(In progress.) In conjunction with its analysis and preparation of streamlined review procedures pursuant to SB 35, staff initiated an exploration of potential procedures to expedite review for affordable housing projects. Staff anticipate completion of the analysis in 2019 with consideration by the Board of Supervisors in 2020.

2017

Not started.

2016

Not started.

2015

Not started.

Program 1.e - Consider Adjustments to Second Unit Development Standards

Objective: Expand and improve housing choice and stock, especially for smaller households and local workforce.
Schedule: 2016
Status:

2018

(Complete.) In December 2018, the Board of Supervisors extended and expanded upon its 2018 pilot program meant to encourage the creation of Junior Accessory Dwelling Units (JADUs) through the waiver of up to $1,500 in associated building permit fees. For the 2019 renewal, the Board continued the $1,500 JADU fee waiver, and expanded the scope of the program to include Accessory Dwelling Units (ADUs), which are now eligible for up to $3,500 in building permit fee waivers. The Board also waived Roadway Impact Fees for JADUs. To be eligible for fee waivers, property owners must commit to refrain from using the subject unit as a short-term rental for two-years following issuance of the certification of occupancy.  The two-year moratorium is meant to encourage owners of new ADUs and JADUs to rent their units to long-term tenants. 

2017

(Complete.) The Board of Supervisors adopted amendments to the County Development Code in March 2017. The update formally aligns the County's policies with 2016 State Accessory Dwelling Unit (ADU) and Junior Accessory Dwelling Unit (JADU) legislation (SB 1069, AB 2299, and AB 2406) and reduces unnecessary barriers to the development of those units. Amendments include reduction of parking requirements and reduced fees. To increase housing choice, the Board increased maximum floor area for new ADUs from 750 SF to 1200 SF and eliminated owner-occupancy requirements. In addition, the amendments exempted existing (as of January 1, 2017) ADUs from all requirements.

In December 2017, the Board of Supervisors adopted a resolution authorizing the CDA Director to waive up to $1,500 of planning and building permit fees for JADUs proposed in 2018, so long as the owner volunteers to refrain from using that JADU as a short-term rental for the ensuing one-year period.

2016

Initiated,

2015

Not started.

Program 1.f - Review and Consider Updating Parking Standards

Objective: Increase utilization of land for housing development; seek efficient parking standards based on housing type and location.
Schedule: 2016
Status:

2018

(Complete.) In December 2018, the Board of Supervisors adopted amendments to County parking standards to reduce parking space requirements for projects developed under the Housing Overlay Designation policy, in transit-rich areas, and for affordable housing developed near transit. The amendments also authorized tandem parking for certain residential uses.

2017

(In progress.) In October 2016, the Marin Department of Public Works (DPW) contracted a consultant to research how the County could apply contemporary best management practices to address the parking needs of several development types: Infill, transit-oriented, mixed-use, commercial, special needs housing, group homes, skilled nursing facilities, multifamily housing, senior housing, and affordable housing. The parking standards update has been administered principally through the lens of this Housing Element program. Staff anticipates that amendments to the County’s parking standards will be presented to the Board of Supervisors in 2018.

2016

Initiated.

2015

Initiated.

Program 1.g - Codify Affordable Housing Incentives Identified in the Community Development Element

Objective: Implement the CWP; support the development of affordable housing.
Schedule: 2016
Status:

2018

(Complete.) The County authorizes waiver of Building and Planning permit fees and reimbursement of Environmental Health Service fees for affordable housing developments. The County’s Mixed-Use Policy allows developments containing housing affordable to low- and very-low-income households to exceed a site’s maximum Floor Area Ratio to accommodate the additional affordable units. Also see response to programs 1.e, “consider adjustments to second unit development standards” and 1.f, “review and consider updating parking standards.”

2017

(Partially implemented.) The Community Development Agency authorizes waiver of Building and Planning permit fees and reimbursement of Environmental Health Service fees for affordable housing developments. The County’s Mixed-Use Policy allows developments containing housing affordable to low- and very-low-income households to exceed a site’s maximum Floor Area Ratio to accommodate the additional affordable units. Also see response to programs 1.f, “review and consider updating parking standards,” and 1.e, “consider adjustments to second unit development standards.”

2016

(Partially-initiated.) Sub program c is complete, (encourage residential and mixed-use development in commercial zones).

2015

Not started.

Program 1.h - Promote Resource Conservation

Objective: Promote energy efficiency, resulting in reduced costs over time which supports long-term housing affordability; provide education to households at a range of income levels on energy efficiency and resource conservation.
Schedule: On-going
Status:

2018

(Complete, on-going.) The County works with and promotes the Bay Area Regional Energy Network’s Single-Family Energy Efficiency programs, which provide rebates for homeowners who make energy efficiency improvements to their homes. This program includes a no-cost support line (Home Energy Advisors) where residents can get third-party technical support for making energy efficiency home improvements and information on applicable rebate and financing programs.

The County also authorizes Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) providers to sell AB 811-consistent loans that enable property owners to secure upfront funding for energy efficiency, water efficiency, renewable energy, and seismic improvement projects which are repaid through an up to 20-year special line item on their property taxes - instead of traditional consumer credit. The program is open to property owners in all Marin jurisdictions and unincorporated Marin County.

Staff also promotes Climate Careers, a program that employs college- and high school-aged local youth to perform ‘Green House Calls,’ which consist of energy and water use audits and installation of energy- and water-saving equipment. The program is made available at no costs to all residents, including renters.

The County participates in the Green and Healthy Home Initiative-Marin (GHHI), a collaborative consortium of service providers in Marin, including the Marin Housing Authority, that provide housing health and sustainability interventions for low-income residents.

In mid-2018, the County was granted funds from the Bay Area Air Quality Management District to develop an appliance rebate program for property owners wishing to switch out natural gas and propane appliances with high efficiency electric units including heating systems, water heaters, ranges, and cooktops. Replacing natural gas appliances with electric models results in reduced greenhouse gas emissions and improved indoor air quality. The program offers higher incentive levels for income-qualified participants. The program launched in early January 2019.

The County continues to operate its Green Building Program, which includes mandatory energy efficiency and green building measures for new construction and remodel projects, as well as technical assistance for applicants. In March 2018, the County’s Board of Supervisors adopted updates to the Green Building Ordinance that expanded and improved the existing standards. Updates include additional energy efficiency requirements for all projects, a renewed focus on reducing greenhouse gas emissions through encouraging all-electric buildings, and electric vehicle charging readiness requirements for all projects. Complete details and resources for the green building ordinance is maintained and updated at www.maringreenbuilding.org;

2017

(Complete, on-going.) The Community Development Agency (CDA) works with and promotes the Bay Area Regional Energy Network’s Single-Family Energy Efficiency programs, which provide rebates for homeowners that make energy efficiency improvements to their homes.

Staff also promotes California Youth Energy Services, a program that employs college- and high school-aged local youth to perform ‘Green House Calls,’ which consist of energy and water use audits and installation of energy- and water-saving equipment. The program is made available at no costs to all residents, including renters.

CDA participates in the Green and Healthy Home Initiative-Marin (GHHI), a collaborative consortium of service providers in Marin that provide housing health and sustainability interventions for low-income residents.

2016

Currently implementing.

2015

Currently implementing.

Program 1.i - Consider Simplifying Review of Residential Development Project in Planned Districts

Objective: Consider amending the Development Code to establish ministerial review in planned zoning districts. Consider allowing Master Plans to establish site criteria for ministerial review.
Schedule: 2016
Status:

2018

See 2017 Annual Progress Report.

2017

(Complete.) In March 2017, the Board of Supervisors amended the County Development Code to permit Master Plans to set ministerial development standards. The Board of Supervisors also approved modifications to planned zoning districts; the County now evaluates them through a more streamlined process of site review, rather than full design review. In many cases, this change is anticipated to reduce time spent on review by 50% or more.

2016

Initiated.

2015

Not started.

Program 1.j - Consider Adjusting Height Limits for Multifamily Residential Buildings

Objective: Consider amending the Development Code to increase the allowable height for multifamily residential development.
Schedule: 2018
Status:

2018

(In progress.) County staff initiated a process to address this program as part of a broader set Development Code amendments, scheduling hearings for those amendments in early 2019.

2017

(Not started.) Current Planning staff anticipates presentation of amendments to the Planning Commission in the second half of 2018, or the first half of 2019.

2016

Not started.

2017

Not started.

Program 1.k - Clarify Applicability of State Density Bonus

Objective: Evaluate policies in the CWP and Development Code and amend as appropriate to ensure consistency with Gov. Code § 65915.
Schedule 2015
Status

2018

(Not started). Implementation of this program requires CEQA review. To conserve resources, staff proposes to integrate evaluation of the State density bonus program with a forthcoming General Plan update, scheduled for initiation in late 2019 or early 2020.   

2017

(Not started.) Implementation of this program requires CEQA review. To conserve resources, staff proposes to integrate evaluation of the State density bonus program with a forthcoming update of the Countywide Plan.

2016

(Not started.) Scheduled for concurrent implementation with Program 1.c in 2016.

2015

(Not Started.) Scheduled for concurrent implementation with Program 1.c.

Housing Goal 2: Meet Housing Needs through a Variety of Housing Choices

Policies

Policy 2.1 Special Needs Groups

Promote the development and rehabilitation of housing for special needs groups, including seniors, people living with disabilities, agricultural workers, individuals and families who are homeless, people in need of mental health care, individuals with developmental disabilities, single-parent families, large families, extremely low income households, and other persons identified as having special needs in Marin County. Link housing to programs of the Department of Health and Human Services in order to coordinate assistance to people with special needs.

Policy 2.2 Housing Choice

Implement policies that facilitate housing development and preservation to meet the needs of Marin County's workforce and low income population.

Policy 2.3 Incentives for Affordable Housing

Continue to provide a range of incentives and flexible standards for affordable housing in order to ensure development certainty and cost savings for affordable housing provisions.

Policy 2.4 Protect Existing Housing

Protect and enhance the housing we have and ensure that existing affordable housing will remain affordable.

Programs

Program 2.a - Encourage Housing for Special Needs Households

Objective: Promote a mix of housing types appropriate to the housing needs of the community, including extremely low-income and special needs households.
Schedule: Annually and on-going
Status:

2018

(Complete, on-going). Staff leverages the County's position as a funder of local, affordable housing development to advocate for the provision of extremely-low-income and special needs housing.

In 2018, the County allocated $920,723 in General Fund dollars for rapid rehousing and permanent supportive housing programs for individuals and families experiencing homelessness. The Department of Health and Human Services also secured $4,496,522 in Continuum of Care funding, a $95,145 Emergency Solutions Grant for rapid rehousing, $882,824 in CalWORKS Housing Support Program rapid rehousing funding, $4,831,856 in Homeless Emergency Aid Program funding, and $508,836 in California Emergency Solutions and Housing funding.

Through its Housing Trust Fund, the County granted $200,000 towards the rehabilitation of 11 permanent supportive housing units for older adults recently experiencing homelessness. It also loaned $3,600,000 to a nonprofit affordable housing developer to support the acquisition and development of a 54-unit housing development; the County leveraged its funding position to secure an additional 11-unit set aside for older adults recently experiencing homelessness.

Through the Spring 2018 Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) and HOME Investment Partnerships Program (HOME) allocation process, the County dedicated $141,008 towards predevelopment activities supporting the future creation of an emergency shelter for people experiencing homelessness; $300,000 towards the rehabilitation of 11 permanent supportive housing units for older adults recently experiencing homelessness; $20,000 towards capital improvements to support therapeutic services at a residence for individuals with developmental disabilities; $100,000 towards the development of an Accessory Dwelling Unit intended to provide affordable housing opportunities for two individuals with developmental disabilities; $30,000 to support home modifications for low-income individuals with disabilities; $718,306 towards the development of a new affordable housing complex for older adults; $20,000 to support rehabilitation of an affordable, senior housing development that currently serves some individuals with special needs; and $28,234 to support a housing locator program that identifies housing opportunities for precariously-housed and homeless families and individuals.

2017

(Complete, on-going.) Staff leverages the County's position as a funder of local, affordable housing development to advocate for the provision of extremely-low-income and special needs housing. Staff have coordinated with County Health and Human Services to develop a Request for Proposal for $1,418,973 of Mental Health Services Act funds to encourage the generation of projects that create new housing opportunities for individuals with serious mental illness. Through the Spring 2017 CDBG and HOME allocation process, the County dedicated $50,000 towards the rehabilitation of an emergency shelter for victims of domestic violence; $75,350 towards capital improvements and rehabilitation of housing for individuals with developmental disabilities; $527,406 towards the development of a new, affordable senior housing complex; and $23,379 towards rehabilitation of an affordable, senior housing development that currently serves some individuals with special needs.

2016

Currently implementing.

2015

Currently implementing.

Program 2.b - Enable Group Residential Care Facilities

Objective: Provide regulatory measures to facilitate housing provision and options for all segments of the community, including special needs populations.
Schedule: On-going
Status:

2018

(Complete, on-going.) Small group homes, defined as those with six or fewer residents, are permitted by right in all residential zoning districts. Large group homes, defined as those with at least seven residents, may apply for a conditional use permit in any residential zoning district.

2017

(Complete, on-going.) Before the March 2017 Development Code amendments, several zoning districts restricted the eligibility of group homes with seven or more residents; they were eligible for conditional use permits only where authorized by a Master Plan. The 2017 amendments modified this policy to make group homes with seven or more residents eligible for conditional use permits throughout several zoning districts: Agriculture Residential Planned (ARP), Residential Single Family Planned (RSP), Residential Multiple Planned (RMP), Residential Mobile Home Park (RX), Floating Home Marina (RF), Residential Commercial Multiple Planned (RCMP), and Planned Office (OP).

In those same districts, Residential Care Facilities were similarly constrained by a requirement that their development be permitted only where authorized by a Master Plan. The amendments removed the requirement of Master Plan authorization, reclassifying Residential Care Facilities as principally permitted uses. In addition, Residential Care Facilities were added as a permitted use in Planned Commercial (OP) districts.

The amendments also removed language that inhibited people with disabilities from availing themselves of services and housing opportunities provided by group homes.

2016

Currently implementing.

2015

Currently implementing.

Program 2.c - Make provisions for Multifamily Housing Amenities

Objective: Make appropriate consideration for families with children and larger households.
Schedule: On-going
Status:

2018

(Complete, on-going.) Consistent with guidance from HUD on the County’s Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing (AFFH) obligations, staff actively encourages development of affordable, multifamily housing opportunities for families with children and larger households in areas of opportunity. The County also supports the creation of housing opportunities for families with children and larger households through its non-discrimination and affirmative marketing policies (see response to program 2.h, "require non-discrimination clauses").

In October 2018, the Housing and Federal Grants Division released a $1,000,000 Notice of Funding Availability intended to jumpstart the development of affordable family housing in areas of opportunity. Staff anticipate the presentation of funding recommendations to the Board of Supervisors in the spring of 2019.

2017

(Complete, on-going.) Consistent with guidance from HUD on the County’s Affirmatively Further Fair Housing (AFFH) obligations, staff actively encourages development of affordable, multifamily housing opportunities for families with children and larger households in areas of opportunity. The County also supports the creation of housing opportunities for families with children and larger households through its non-discrimination and affirmative marketing policies (see response to program 2.h, "require non-discrimination clauses").

In 2017, the Federal Grants program allocated $288,886 in CDBG and $121,759 in HOME funding to support the acquisition and rehabilitation of a 27-unit, multifamily housing complex located near high-performing school and public transit.

Staff initiated the development of a $1,000,000 Request for Proposals (RFP) to develop affordable, family housing in areas of opportunity; it anticipates release of the RFP in 2018.

2016

(Currently implementing.)

2015

(Currently implementing.)

Program 2.d - Foster Linkages to Health and Human Services Programs

Objective: Respond to special needs through comprehensive services.
Schedule: On-going
Status:

2018

(Complete, on-going.) When appropriate, Housing and Federal Grants staff coordinate housing and service funding opportunities with Health and Human Services (HHS) staff. Also see response to program 2.e, “support efforts to house the homeless.”

2017

(Complete, on-going.) When appropriate, Housing and Federal Grants staff coordinate housing and service funding opportunities with Health and Human Services (HHS) staff. Also see response to program 2.e, “support efforts to house the homeless.”

2016

Currently implementing.

2015

Currently implementing.

Program. 2.e - Support efforts to house the homeless.

Objective: Respond to homeless needs through comprehensive services.
Schedule: On-going.
Status:

2018

(Complete, on-going.) The Housing and Federal Grants Division participates as a voting member in bimonthly Homeless Policy Steering Committee (HPSC) meetings. Staff also participate in Opening Doors, an organization which seeks to strategically align broad stakeholder groups in the creation of more affordable housing units across Marin jurisdictions, with a focus on solving chronic homelessness. Key partners – including Marin County Health and Human Services (HHS), Marin Housing Authority (MHA), the Marin County CDA, Marin cities and towns, service providers, and philanthropic donors – meet quarterly to ensure alignment of services and funding.

In 2018, the County allocated $949,890 in HOME funds and $3,800,000 in Marin Housing Trust Fund monies to support the development of 22 affordable housing units with wraparound services earmarked for older adults who have recently experienced homelessness. The County also allocated $141,008 in CDBG funds to support predevelopment activities for a proposed new shelter for individuals and families experiencing homelessness.

2017

(Complete, on-going.) The Housing and Federal Grants Division participates as a voting member in bimonthly Homeless Policy Steering Committee (HPSC) meetings. Staff also participate in the Marin Chronic Homeless Action Task-Force (MCHAT) which seeks to strategically align broad stakeholder groups in the creation of more affordable housing units across Marin jurisdictions. Key agencies – Marin County Health and Human Services (HHS), Marin Housing Authority (MHA), and the Marin County Community Development Agency (CDA) – meet quarterly to ensure alignment of services and funding.

2016

Currently implementing.

2015

Currently implementing.

Program. 2.f - Engage in a countywide effort to address homeless needs.

Objective: Respond to homeless needs through comprehensive services.
Schedule: On-going
Status:

2018

(Complete, on-going). See response to program 2.e, "support efforts to house the homeless."

2017

(Complete, on-going.) The Community Development Agency removed a barrier to entry for homeless services; it leveraged its position as funder to preclude grant recipients from requiring proof of residency. Also see response to program 2.e, "support efforts to house the homeless."

Planners routinely consult a Housing Element layer in the County's GIS application for planning and land management; the Housing Element layer identifies the location of and expresses minimum densities for sites listed in the Site Inventory.

2016

Currently implementing.

2015

Currently implementing.

Program. 2.g - Ensure reasonable accommodation.

Objective: Reduce barriers in housing for individuals with disabilities.
Schedule: On-going.
Status:

2018

(Partially complete, on-going.) The County is promoting universal design standards through provided on a County website developed in 2018 to encourage the creation of Accessory Dwelling Units and Junior Accessory Dwelling Units throughout the county. The website is available at: www.marincounty.org/makeroomformarin.

Housing and Federal Grants Division staff actively refer tenants in need of assistance making reasonable accommodation requests in the private housing market to the Marin Center for Independent Living (MCIL) and Fair Housing Advocates of Northern California (FHANC). Both organizations were supported in their work by CDBG funding. MCIL received a $30,000 allocation to its home modification program to fund alterations in homes occupied by low-income individuals with disabilities; MCIL funded 17 such modification requests in 2018. FHANC received a $60,000 allocation to support its fair housing monitoring and assistance. It intervened on behalf of 78 households requesting reasonable accommodations and succeeded in securing reasonable accommodation concessions in 67 of those cases.

Also see response to program 1.f, “review and consider updating parking standards.”

2017

(Partially implemented, on-going.) In March 2017, the Board of Supervisors realigned the Community Development Agency’s (CDA) Reasonable Accommodation Ordinance with established best practices. The appeal procedures were modified to mirror those of the CDA Code Enforcement Program; CDA now contracts the State Office of Administrative Hearings (OAH) to hear and issue appeal determinations. Housing and Federal Grants Division staff actively refer tenants in need of assistance making reasonable accommodation requests in the private housing market to the Marin Center for Independent Living (MCIL) and Fair Housing Advocates of Northern California (FHANC). Also see response to program 1.f, “review and consider updating parking standards.”

2016

Currently implementing.

2015

Currently implementing.

Program. 2.h - Require non-discrimination clauses.

Objective: Reduce discrimination.
Schedule: On-going.
Status:

2018

(Complete, on-going.) The County requires non-discrimination clauses in contracts to which it is a party.

Housing and Federal Grants staff developed a new affirmative marketing tool and implemented a requirement for applicants requesting Federal Grants and Housing Trust Fund monies to submit affirmative marketing plans as part of their funding applications. The Federal Grants program does not execute contracts until an awardee’s affirmative marketing plan has received approval. Awardees must implement their approved affirmative marketing plan to be eligible for reimbursement.

2017

(Complete, on-going.) The County requires non-discrimination clauses in contracts to which it is a party. In addition, Housing and Federal Grants staff regularly works with grant and loan recipients to require affirmative marketing policies; all programs and projects funded by County Housing Trust Fund, CDBG, or HOME funds are required to develop and implement affirmative marketing plans.

2016

Currently implementing.

2015

Currently implementing.

Program. 2.i - Increase tenant protections.

Objective: Protect renters from significant rent increases and reduce displacement.
Schedule: 2016 and on-going.
Status:

2018

(Complete, on-going.) The County adopted Ordinance 3705 requiring cause to terminate a residential tenancy, more commonly referred to as Just Cause for Eviction, on December 18, 2018. Ordinance 3705, codified as Marin County Code Chapter 5.100, applies to all properties in the unincorporated county with at least three units; exemptions are provided for Accessory Dwelling Units and Junior Accessory Dwelling Units, units with government-subsidized rents, all units in a development where at least 49% of the units are restricted as affordable, and units occupied by on-site property managers. For instances wherein a landlord issues an eviction on the grounds that the unit is to be permanently removed from the rental market, Ordinance 3705 requires the landlord to provide the tenant household at least 120 days’ notice of the intended final date of occupancy.

2017

(Partially complete, on-going.) To address escalating rent increases and to promote community accountability, the Board of Supervisors adopted a Rental Housing Dispute Resolution program in December 2017. The program provides that for situations in which a tenant is given notice of a rent increase exceeding 5% in a twelve-month period, a landlord or tenant may be required to participate in a facilitated, face-to-face conversation about that rent increase. In December 2017, the Board of Supervisors further directed staff to return with a just cause ordinance in the second quarter of 2018. Also see response to program 2.l, "deter housing discrimination."

2016

(Partially initiated.) Source of Income Ordinance adopted 11/8/16.

2015

In process.

Program. 2.j - Promote the development of agricultural worker units in agricultural zones.

Objective: Provide affordable and accessible, local housing for agricultural workers.
Schedule: 2016
Status:

2018

(Partially complete, on-going.) The National Park Service (NPS) is engaged in the development of a management plan for the national parklands. A significant number of the County’s agricultural workers are employed by ranches and farms that rent those lands. Any agricultural housing development that occurs on those lands would need to conform with the NPS management plans following adoption and implementation. In 2018, the County submitted comments and feedback on the draft management plans, with the intention of encouraging and facilitating the creation and maintenance of farmworker housing on NPS lands.

County staff continues in their negotiations to acquire a surplus Coast Guard site with 36 multi-bedroom housing units and to rehabilitate those units for use as affordable family housing. The Coast Guard Housing Working Group recommended the consideration of a set aside for agricultural worker housing. In April and June 2018, Housing and Federal Grants Division staff held two large community meetings to gather input from local residents and other interested parties regarding potential options and ideas for the property that may be considered following the potential acquisition of the property.

CDA staff collaborated with Marin County University of California Cooperative Extension to develop streamlined permitting procedures for agricultural worker housing.

2017

(Partially complete, on-going.) The National Park Service is engaged in the development of a management plan for the national parklands. A considerable number of the County’s agricultural workers are employed by ranches and farms that rent those lands – any agricultural housing development that occurs on that site should conform with the forthcoming management plans.

County staff convened a working group to advise staff on the community vision for the prospective acquisition, preservation and rehabilitation of a Coast Guard site that contains 36 multi-bedroom housing units. The Coast Guard Housing Working Group is actively exploring the inclusion of a set-aside for agricultural workers and their families.

2016

(Initiated.) LCP under review.

2015

Not started.

Program. 2.k - Promote and ensure equal housing opportunity.

Objective: Reduce discrimination.
Schedule: On-going and when the AI is updated.
Status:

2018

(In progress.) The County is currently conducting a comprehensive analysis of policies and barriers to Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing (AFFH). In more than 1400 interviews with individual residents and employees, staff is developing a rigorous inventory and understanding of barriers to housing opportunity. In June 2018, an advisory group of volunteer citizens and a steering committee of stakeholders presented their recommendations to the Board of Supervisors on the topic of “segregation/integration and disproportionate housing needs.” The groups prioritized two policy recommendations: vote on a Just Cause for Eviction ordinance in 2018 and develop a Housing Oversight Committee to develop policies, programs and practices with an equity and racial equity lens that address housing challenges in Marin. The Board of Supervisors acted on the first priority recommendation in 2018 and adopted a Just Cause for Eviction policy; see response to program 2.i, “increase tenant protections.”

2017

(In progress.) The County is currently conducting a comprehensive analysis of policies and barriers to Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing (AFFH). In more than 1300 interviews with individual residents and employees, staff is developing a rigorous inventory and understanding of barriers to housing opportunity. An advisory group of volunteer citizens and a steering committee of stakeholders will synthesize these insights and present recommendations to the Board of Supervisors in May of 2018.

2016

(Currently implementing.) AFFH work plan adopted and initiated.

2015

Currently implementing.

Program. 2.l - Deter housing discrimination.

Objective: Demonstrate responsiveness to discrimination complaints; promote the principles of fair housing.
Schedule: On-going.
Status:

2018

(Complete, on-going.) Since the adoption of the County’s source of income ordinance to prevent discrimination against tenants with third-party housing vouchers, Housing and Federal Grants staff have dedicated resources to support incorporated jurisdictions with research and development of their own source of income protections. In 2018, the Town of Fairfax, the City of Novato, the Town of San Anselmo, and the City of San Rafael adopted similar source of income ordinances. Staff continue to provide technical assistance and resources to other Marin jurisdictions.

2017

(Complete, on-going.) In November 2016, the Board of Supervisors adopted a Fair Housing source of income ordinance to prohibit discrimination against tenants and prospective tenants with third-party rental subsidies (such as Housing Choice or VASH vouchers). In March 2017, the Board elected to expand the applicability of that ordinance to include all residential rented housing units, including single-family homes and Accessory Dwelling Units. Following the adoption of the March amendments, Housing and Federal Grants staff dedicated resources to support incorporated jurisdictions in the research and development of their own source of income protections. In October 2017, staff participated in a study session with the Town of Fairfax’s City Council; the Town is likely to consider adoption of a source of income ordinance in 2018.

Community Development Agency staff continue to refer discrimination complaints to Fair Housing Advocates of Northern California or other appropriate legal services, County or State agencies.

CDA staff continue to refer discrimination complaints to Fair Housing Advocates of Northern California or other appropriate legal services, County or State agencies.

2016

(Currently implementing.) Fair Housing Source of Income Ordinance adopted 11/8/16.

2015

Currently implementing.

Program. 2.m - Implement the Inclusionary Housing Policy.

Objective: Maximize opportunities for affordable housing, particularly with long-term affordability controls and for households at the deepest levels of affordability.
Schedule: On-going.
Status: 

2018

(Complete, on-going.) The County’s longstanding inclusionary housing policy requires subdivisions that result in the creation of two or more lots to dedicate 20 percent of their lots or units as housing affordable to low-income households. Subdivisions with inclusionary obligations equivalent to less than half of a dwelling unit may pay an in-lieu housing fee commensurate to the value of that fractional unit. The County adjusts its in-lieu housing fee annually based on the higher of either the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for Shelter for the Construction Cost Index (CCI) published by the Engineering-News Record. See also response to program 2.n, “apply long-term housing affordability controls.”

In response to the Governor’s approval of AB 1505, which renewed the County’s authority to extend its inclusionary zoning policy to rental housing units, County staff initiated a process to amend its Development Code to renew that application of its inclusionary zoning policy to the rental housing development projects.

2017

(Complete, on-going.) The County’s longstanding inclusionary housing policy requires subdivisions that result in the creation of two or more lots to dedicate 20% of their lots or units as affordable housing. Subdivisions with inclusionary obligations equivalent to less than half of a dwelling unit may pay an in-lieu housing fee commensurate to the value of that fractional unit. The County adjusts its in-lieu housing fee annually based on the higher of either the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for Shelter for the Construction Cost Index (CCI) published by the Engineering-News Record. See also response to program 2.n, “apply long-term housing affordability controls.

2016

Currently implementing.

2015

Currently implementing.

Program. 2.n - Apply long-term housing affordability controls.

Objective: Pursue controls which will preserve the affordable housing stock in perpetuity.
Schedule: On-going
Status:

2018

(Complete, on-going.) An affordable housing development's receipt of Marin Housing Trust Fund monies is typically contingent upon acceptance of a regulatory agreement that imposes affordability restrictions in perpetuity. Exceptions to this requirement are made only for projects with unavoidable constraints that preclude the developer's ability to accept those terms. Examples of such constraints include developments with a determinate term length for land or building leases or conflicts with terms of other sources of public financing.

2017

(Complete, on-going.) An affordable housing development's receipt of County Housing Trust Fund monies is typically contingent upon acceptance of a regulatory agreement that imposes affordability restrictions in perpetuity. Exceptions to this requirement are made only for projects with unavoidable constraints that preclude the developer's ability to accept those terms. Examples of such constraints include developments with a determinate term length for land or building leases or conflicts with terms of other sources of public financing.

2016

Currently implementing.

2015

Currently implementing.

Program. 2.o - Encourage land acquisition and land banking.

Objective: Use land efficiently and allocate land for affordable and special needs development.
Schedule: On-going as needed.
Status:

2018

(Complete, on-going.) Housing and Federal Grants Division staff participate in a committee of funders that seeks out and evaluates potential acquisitions of existing housing and other opportunities for maximizing affordable housing stock throughout the County. Also see response to program 2.e, “support efforts to house the homeless.”

2017

(Complete, on-going.) Housing and Federal Grants Division staff participate in a committee of funders that evaluates potential acquisitions of existing housing and other opportunities for maximizing affordable housing stock throughout the County. Staff also participate in the Marin Chronic Homeless Action Task-Force (MCHAT), which seeks to strategically align broad stakeholder groups to develop more affordable housing opportunities for individuals and families experiencing or formerly experiencing chronic homelessness.

2016

Currently implementing.

2015

Currently implementing.

Program. 2.p - Expedite permit processing of affordable and special needs housing projects.

Objective: Reduce constraints for affordable and special needs developments.
Schedule: 2015
Status:

2018

(In progress.) See response to program 1.d, “study ministerial review for affordable housing.”

2017

(Partially Implemented.) The Housing and Federal Grants Division is reviewing 2017 State housing legislation to determine how it might augment existing internal streamlining policies.

2016

Currently implementing.

2015

Currently implementing.

Program. 2.q - Study best practices for Housing Choice Voucher acceptance.

Objective: Preserve affordable housing opportunities.
Schedule: 2015
Status:

2018

(Complete.) In August 2018, the County executed a $450,000 contract with Marin Housing Authority to renew its Landlord Partnership Program for a second two-year period. The program incentivizes landlord participation in the Housing Choice Voucher program and provides security deposit assistance of tenants. The Landlord Partnership Program works in conjunction with the increasing number of source of income ordinances within the County to increase success rates for voucher holders. In 2018, Marin Housing Authority reported a five percent increase in the success rate; it averaged roughly 60 percent throughout the year.

Also see response to program 2.l, “deter housing discrimination.”

2017

(Complete.) In July 2015, the Board of Supervisors allocated Marin Housing Authority $404,000 to fund a two-year pilot “Landlord Partnership Program” that incentives landlord participation in the Housing Choice Voucher program and provides security deposit assistance for tenants. In November 2016, the Board of Supervisors adopted a fair housing source of income ordinance to prohibit discrimination against tenants and prospective tenants with third-party rental subsidies, such as Housing Choice Vouchers. In March 2017, the Board increased the purview of the ordinance to apply to all residential rentals, including single-family homes. The Marin Housing Authority reports a 9% increase in the success rate for its Housing Choice Voucher program for the 2017 calendar year; it rose to 55%.

2016

Currently implementing.

2015

Currently implementing.

Program. 2.r - Encourage first time homebuyer programs.

Objective: Continue to provide housing opportunities to households with low incomes; seek opportunities for expansion and coordination with other assistance programs.
Schedule: On-going.
Status:

2018

(Complete, on-going.) The Successor Agency to the Marin County Redevelopment Agency funds the Marin Housing Authority (MHA) Below Market Rate homeownership and down payment assistance programs for first-time homebuyers.

The Marin Housing Trust Fund also awarded $250,000 in predevelopment funding for a prospective first-time-homebuyer development. The project could result in the development of up to 80 affordable housing units.

MHA, Fair Housing Advocates of Northern California (FHANC), and Habitat for Humanity Greater San Francisco continue to coordinate and host first-time homebuyer readiness workshops and services.

2017

(Complete, on-going.) The County funds the Marin Housing Authority (MHA) Below Market Rate homeownership and down payment assistance programs for first-time homebuyers. MHA, Fair Housing Advocates of Northern California (FHANC), and Habitat for Humanity Greater San Francisco continue to coordinate and host first-time homebuyer readiness workshops and services.

In December of 2017, Housing Trust Funds contributed $110,000 to the acquisition and conversion of a market-rate single-family home into a Below-Market Rate homeownership opportunity for a first-time homebuyer.

2016

Currently implementing.

2015

Currently implementing.

Program. 2.s - Link code enforcement with public information systems.

Objective: Secure affordable, safe housing; improve the safety and quality of existing housing stock.
Schedule: On-going.
Status:

2018

(Complete, on-going.) County staff enforce housing, building, and fire codes to ensure compliance with basic health and safety building standards. Referrals to Marin Housing Authority’s Rehabilitation Loan Program, affordable housing opportunities, and other services are provided as appropriate.

2017

(Partially complete, on-going.) The Housing Inspection Program conducts biennial inspections of multifamily rental housing properties to ensure compliance with applicable housing, building, and fire standards.

2016

(Currently implementing.)

2015

(Currently implementing.)

Program. 2.t - Assist in maximizing use of rehabilitation programs.

Objective: Preserve the existing housing stock through rehabilitation; increase awareness of programs in the community.
Schedule: On-going.
Status:

2018

(Complete, on-going.) The Marin Housing Authority (MHA) Rehabilitation Loan program provided approximately 12 loans to low-, very-low-, and extremely-low-income homeowners in 2018. MHA staff routinely refer recipients of rehabilitation loans to the Green and Healthy Homes Initiative-Marin (GHHI), a collaborative consortium of service providers in Marin that provide housing health and sustainability interventions – including subsidies and rebate programs – for low-income residents.

2017

(Complete, on-going.) The Marin Housing Authority (MHA) Rehabilitation Loan program provided approximately 20 loans to low-, very-low-, and extremely-low-income homeowners in 2017. MHA staff routinely refer recipients of rehab loans to the Green and Healthy Homes Initiative-Marin (GHHI), a collaborative consortium of service providers in Marin that provide housing health and sustainability interventions – including subsidies and rebate programs - for low-income residents.

2016

Currently implementing.

2015

Currently implementing.

Program. 2.u - Monitor rental housing stock.

Objective: Preserve the existing stock of rental housing as well as rental housing as a housing choice.
Schedule: On-going.
Status:

2018

(Complete, on-going.) In December 2018, the County adopted a requirement that starting in 2019, landlords must report rents and general occupancy information for all rental properties subject to the Just Cause for Eviction ordinance. The County will begin collecting and analyzing this information following the start of this requirement.

Housing and Federal Grants Division staff participate in an affordable-housing funders group (see response to program 2.o, “encourage land acquisition and land banking”) and Opening Doors (see response to program 2.e, “support efforts to house the homeless”), two groups actively working to identify and evaluate opportunities for acquisition and preservation of naturally-occurring, affordable units.

The County Development Code prohibits conversion of multi-family rental units into condominium conversion unless the vacancy rate exceeds 5% and the change does not reduce the ratio of multi-family rental units to less than 25% of the total number of dwelling units in the County.

Also see response to program 2.n, “apply long-term affordability controls.”

2017

(Complete, on-going.) Housing and Federal Grants Division staff participate in an affordable-housing funders group (see response to program 2.o, “encourage land acquisition and land banking”) and the Marin Chronic Homeless Action Task-Force, two groups actively working to identify and evaluate opportunities for acquisition and preservation of naturally-occurring, affordable units.

In 2017, the Federal Grants program allocated $410,645 of CDBG and HOME funds to the acquisition, preservation and rehabilitation of a 27-unit, multi-family apartment complex with expired affordability regulations. The County’s contributions secured the affordability of all 27 units at rents affordable to low- and very-low-income families; no families were caused to be displaced.

The County Development Code prohibits conversion of multi-family rental units into condominium conversion unless the vacancy rate exceeds 5% and the change does not reduce the ratio of multi-family rental units to less than 25% of the total number of dwelling units in the County.

2016

Currently implementing.

2015

Currently implementing.

Program. 2.v - Study housing needs and constraints specific to West Marin.

Objective: Consider ways to maximize housing opportunities in West Marin, increase affordable housing options for low- and moderate-income households.
Schedule: 2018.
Status:

2018

(In progress.) In August 2018, the County elected to renew its financial, administrative and technical support of the Community Land Trust Association of West Marin’s (CLAM) Real Community Rentals pilot program for a second two-year period. The Real Community Rentals program leverages community relationships to encourage the creation of new and affordable rental housing opportunities in underutilized residential properties. CLAM provides education, assistance with  project management, and a screening and referral service to prospective landlords who agree to rent their units at rates affordable to low- and moderate-income households.

In April and June 2018, Housing and Federal Grants Division staff organized two community meetings that each drew participation from 150 – 200 residents. The meetings were structured to gather community input for a Request for Funding Proposals to solicit a developer to rehabilitate and manage the potential acquisition, renovation, and conversion of a surplus Coast Guard site into affordable housing (see program 2.j, “promote the development of agricultural worker units in agricultural zones”). The County allocated $16,300 in Marin Housing Trust Fund monies toward pre-development costs for this project.

The Marin Housing Trust Fund also sponsored $25,000 of pre-development costs incurred by the Bolinas Community Land Trust as it explored the acquisition, rehabilitation, and/or development of five affordable housing projects in the West Marin community of Bolinas.

The Federal Grants program allocated $50,000 towards the acquisition of a vacant lot proposed for development as affordable housing. The program also contributed $14,000 towards the replacement of inoperable fire escapes at two affordable housing properties located in Point Reyes Station and Stinson Beach.

In November 2018, the West Marin electorate voted to increase Transient Occupancy Taxes by four percent. Half of the revenue generated by that initiative shall be earmarked to support the creation of affordable housing opportunities in West Marin.

2017

Not started.

2016

Not started.

2015

Not started.

Housing Goal 3: Ensure Leadership and Institutional Capacity

Build and maintain local government institutional capacity and monitor accomplishments to respond to housing needs effectively over time.

Policies

Policy 3.1 Coordination

Take a proactive approach in local housing coordination, policy development, and communication. Share resources with other agencies to effectively create and respond to opportunities for achieving housing goals.

Policy 3.2 Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation

Perform effective management of housing data relating to Marin County housing programs, production, and achievements. Monitor and evaluate housing policies on an ongoing basis, and respond effectively to changing housing conditions and needs of the population over time.

Policy 3.3 Funding

Actively and creatively seek ways to increase funding resources for lower income and special needs housing.

Programs

Program. 3.a - Consider methods for improving County's outreach with respect to affordable housing.

Objective: Conduct outreach and education to encourage and facilitate affordable housing.
Schedule: 2017.
Status:

2018

(Complete, on-going.) In April and June 2018, Housing and Federal Grants staff held two community meetings to gather community input on a potential affordable housing project involving the acquisition of a surplus Coast Guard facility in Point Reyes Station. The meetings were held in a local school, conducted with Spanish interpretation, and livestreamed and recorded to increase transparency and public access. A community advisory working group advised staff throughout the process. Housing and Federal Grants Division staff developed a webpage to provide resources and project updates and answer frequently asked questions. Staff worked with stakeholder groups to disseminate news and announcements in English and Spanish via email, poster, social media, public service announcements, and news releases.

In September 2018, Housing and Federal Grants Division staff hosted two information sessions on Just Cause for Eviction policies in advance of Board deliberations on the proposed ordinance. The sessions were held in the communities of San Geronimo Valley and Marin City, which were selected for their geographic accessibility and to encourage participation among residents least likely to attend. Presentation were taped and published, and supplemental resources were developed in English and Spanish. Housing and Federal Grants Division staff developed a webpage to serve as a resource for residents and stakeholders. Advertisement of the information sessions and formal Board hearings was conducted in accordance with an affirmative marketing plan created by staff.

The Housing and Federal Grants Division publishes staff reports in Spanish and ensures that Spanish interpretation services are made available at Board of Supervisors hearings. To make those hearings more accessible to working households, the Board of Supervisors often holds hearings related to affordable housing in the evening.

2017

(Complete and on-going.) The Housing and Federal Grants Division publishes staff reports in Spanish and Vietnamese and ensures that Spanish interpretation services are made available at Board of Supervisors hearings. To make those hearings more accessible to working households, the Board of Supervisors often holds hearings related to affordable housing in the evening.

2016

Currently implementing.

2015

Currently implementing.

Program. 3.b - Advance organizational effectiveness.

Objective: Promote shared resources and coordination towards the achievement of common goals.
Schedule: On-going.
Status:

2018

(Complete, on-going.) Staff continues to coordinate with other agencies, divisions, and departments as is appropriate to support the accomplishment of intersectional programs and goals. Most notably in 2018, Housing and Federal Grants Division staff collaborated on housing issues with CDA’s Building and Safety, Code Enforcement, Current Planning, Environmental Health Services, Long-Range Planning, and Sustainability divisions, Marin County Department of Finance, Marin County Information Services and Technology, Marin County Department of Public Works, Marin County District Attorney’s Consumer Mediation Program, Marin County Health and Human Services, Marin County Fire Department, the Marin Housing Authority, and the Transportation Authority of Marin. Staff also provided technical support to the Town of Corte Madera, Town of Fairfax, the City of Larkspur, the City of Mill Valley, the City of Novato, the Town of Ross, the Town of San Anselmo, the City of San Rafael, the City of Sausalito, the Town of Tiburon. Also see response to program 3.f., “promote countywide collaboration on housing issues.”

2017

(Complete, on-going.) Staff continues to coordinate with other agencies, divisions, and departments as is appropriate to support the accomplishment of intersectional programs and goals. Most notably in 2017, Housing and Federal Grants Division staff collaborated with CDA’s Current Planning, Building and Safety, and Environmental Health Services divisions, the Marin Department of Public Works, the District Attorney’s Consumer Mediation Program, Health and Human Services, the Marin County Fire Department, and the Marin Housing Authority. Staff also provided technical support to the Town of Fairfax, the City of Mill Valley, the City of Novato, the City of San Rafael, and the City of Sausalito.

2016

Currently implementing.

2015

Currently implementing.

Program. 3.c - Provide and promote opportunities for community participation in housing issues.

Objective: Foster community support for affordable housing; engage the community in housing issues.
Schedule: On-going.
Status:

2018

(Complete, on-going.) Staff regularly give presentations to community groups and conferences on affordable and fair housing issues. The list of community groups and events that sponsored presentations in 2018 include the Canal Alliance Board of Directors, Fair Housing Conference, local schools, Marin Association of Realtors, the Marin County Human Rights Commission, Marin Organizing Committee, Marin Planning Directors Luncheon, Marin Rental Property Association, the San Geronimo Valley Housing Fair, the San Rafael Leadership Institute, Shared Housing Community Forum, West Marin Collaborative, and the Youth Leadership Institute.

Staff also appeared on local Univision and Fox cable news programs to discuss affordable housing policies.

Also see response to program 3.a, “consider methods for improving County’s outreach with respect to affordable housing.”

2017

(Complete, on-going.) Staff regularly give presentations to community groups and conferences on affordable and fair housing issues. The list of community groups that received such presentations in 2017 includes the Citizens Advisory Committee (CAC) on Economic Development and Affordable Housing, the Commission on Aging, Dominican University, Fairfax Town Council, First Five Marin, Marin Coalition, Mill Valley Housing Summit, Mill Valley Rotary Club, Municipal Management Association of Northern California (MMANC), San Geronimo Valley Affordable Housing Association, the San Rafael Leader Institute, and local middle and high schools. In addition, as part of an effort to convert the Coast Guard Housing Facility in Point Reyes Station, the County appointed a working group of community members to advise staff on the creation of a community engagement plan and development of a Request for Proposals. Also see response to program 2.k, “promote and ensure housing opportunity.”

2016

Currently implementing.

2015

Currently implementing.

Program. 3.d - Coordinate with regional transportation and housing activities.

Objective: Maximize housing opportunity sites; decrease transportation congestion; participate in regional planning exercises.
Schedule: On-going.
Status:

2018

(Complete, on-going.) CDA works closely with the Transportation Authority of Marin (TAM) and the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) to produce informative local data. Representatives from those agencies attend regular area planning director’s meetings.

2017

(Complete, on-going.) The Community Development Agency (CDA) works closely with the Metropolitan Transportation Commission, the Transportation Authority of Marin (TAM), and the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) to produce informative, local data. Representatives of CDA, TAM, and ABAG attend regular area planning director’s meetings.

2016

(Currently implementing.)

2015

(Currently implementing.)

Program. 3.e - Coordinate with other agencies.

Objective: Streamline the development process and reduce constraints to the development of affordable and special needs housing.
Schedule: On-going as projects are proposed.
Status:

2018

(Complete, on-going.) Housing and Federal Grants Division staff coordinate with other agencies to facilitate the efficient processing of affordable and special needs housing applications in both the unincorporated county and the incorporated cities and towns. When project approvals require cooperation between departments, CDA staff facilitate expedition of permits and waiver of fees whenever possible and appropriate. To reduce funding barriers to affordable and special needs housing projects in incorporated cities and towns, the Board of Supervisors maintains a policy that it may support those projects through allocations of Marin Housing Trust Fund monies.

2017

(Complete, on-going.) Housing and Federal Grants Division staff coordinate with other agencies to facilitate the efficient processing of affordable and special needs housing applications in both the unincorporated county and the incorporated cities and towns. When project approvals require cooperation between departments, CDA staff facilitate expedition of permits and waiver of fees whenever possible and appropriate. To reduce funding barriers to affordable and special needs housing projects in incorporated cities and towns, the Board of Supervisors maintains a policy that it may support those projects through allocations of County Housing Trust Fund monies.

2016

Currently implementing.

2015

Currently implementing.

Program. 3.f - Promote countywide collaboration on housing.

Objective: Collaborate with Marin cities and towns to address regional planning and housing issues.
Schedule: On-going.
Status:

2018

(Complete, on-going) Staff work with all towns and cities in Marin through the CDBG Priority Setting Committee (PSC) to fund affordable housing and ensure that jurisdictions affirmatively further fair housing. In 2018, staff convened a countywide working group of planners to encourage interjurisdictional collaboration on housing issues and solutions, with a specific focus on responding to 2017 State housing Package. The working group established common goals and coordinated on housing legislation, planning, production, and preservation of existing affordability.

2017

(Complete, on-going.) Staff work with all towns and cities through the CDBG Priority Setting Committee (PSC) to fund affordable housing and ensure that jurisdictions affirmatively further fair housing (AFFH). In 2018, staff will convene a Countywide group of planners to collaborate around housing issues, especially related to the 2017 housing legislation.

2016

Currently implementing.

2015

Currently implementing.

Program. 3.g - Preserve existing housing stock.

Objective: Offer a range of housing choices and affordability through existing housing stock.
Schedule: 2015 and on-going.
Status:

2018

(Partially complete, on-going). See response to programs 2.n, “apply long-term housing affordability controls” and 2.u, "monitor rental housing stock."

2017

(Partially complete, on-going.) See response to program 2.u, "monitor rental housing stock."

2016

Currently implementing.

2015

Currently implementing.

Program. 3.h - Monitor inclusionary housing programs.

Objective: Evaluate the program for ways to increase its effectiveness; collect funding to leverage for affordable housing.
Schedule: On-going.
Status:

2018

(Complete, on-going.) Housing and Federal Grants staff monitor Planning and Building applications on a weekly basis to ensure the appropriate application of inclusionary zoning policies. The County adjusts its Affordable Housing Impact, In-Lieu Housing, and Rental Housing Impact fees annually based on the higher of either the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for Shelter for the Construction Cost Index (CCI) published by the Engineering-News Record. The County’s Jobs/Housing Linkage Fees for Residential Care Facilities and Skilled Nursing Facilities are likewise updated. During calendar year 2018, the Marin Housing Trust fund collected $460,572 in impact, inclusionary, and jobs/housing linkage fees.

Also see response to program 2.m, “implement the inclusionary housing policy.”

2017

(Complete, on-going.) Housing and Federal Grants staff monitor Planning and Building applications on a weekly basis to ensure the appropriate application of the inclusionary housing program. The County adjusts its Affordable Housing Impact, In-Lieu Housing, and Rental Housing Impact fees annually based on the higher of either the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for Shelter for the Construction Cost Index (CCI) published by the Engineering-News Record. The County’s Jobs/Housing Linkage Fees for Residential Care Facilities and Skilled Nursing Facilities are likewise updated. For the fiscal year ending June 30, 2017, the Housing Trust fund collected $244,955 in impact fees.

2016

Currently implementing.

2015

Currently implementing.

Program. 3.i - Undertake Housing Element monitoring, evaluation, and revisions.

Objective: Evaluate progress, review accomplishments and modify as needed.
Schedule: On-going.
Status:

2018

(Complete, on-going.) The County submitted its 2017 Annual Progress Report to the California Department of Housing and Community Development and the Office and Planning and Research in advance of the filing deadline.

2017

(Complete, on-going.) The County submitted its 2016 Annual Progress Report to the California Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD) and the Office and Planning and Research (OPR) in advance of the 2017 filing deadline. For this 2017 Annual Progress Report, staff has improved its reporting practices to provide the public with greater detail in the County’s implementation of programs presented in Table C.

2016

Currently implementing.

2015

Currently implementing.

Program. 3.j - Provide and participate in local affordable housing training and education.

Objective: Serve as a resource to the community; seek to expand staff knowledge related to affordable housing.
Schedule: On-going.
Status:

2018

(Complete, on-going.) Housing and Federal Grants Division staff participated in community workshops and training sessions related to federal and HUD budget proposals and appropriations, cultural intelligence and competency, Fair Housing, HOME, reasonable accommodation and accessibility, tenant protection policies, 2018 state housing legislation, the National Environmental Protection Act, the California Environmental Quality Act, the California Building Code, disaster housing recovery for vulnerable populations, and sustainable food systems and farmworker housing.

2017

(Complete, on-going.) Housing and Federal Grants Division staff participated in community workshops and training sessions related to reasonable accommodation, the federal budget and funding opportunities for affordable housing, 2017 State housing legislation, Fair Housing, housing solutions for individuals and families experiencing homelessness, short-term rentals, the application of green energy resources to affordable housing, environmental equity, land trusts, and sea level rise adaptation guidelines. Also see response to program 3.c, “provide and promote opportunities for community participation in housing issues.”

2016

Currently implementing.

2015

Currently implementing.

Program. 3.k - Provide leadership to the Marin Workforce Housing Trust.

Objective: Prioritize funding for extremely-low-income and special needs populations.
Schedule: On-going.
Status:

2018

(Complete, on-going.) See 2017 Annual Progress Report.

2017

(Complete, on-going.) As an outcome of the dissolution of the Marin Workforce Housing Trust Fund, the remaining balance will be transferred to the County Housing Trust Fund. Housing and Federal Grants Division staff will continue to advocate for prioritization of housing opportunities for extremely-low-income and special-needs households.

2016

Currently implementing.

2015

Currently implementing.

Program. 3.l - Assist with local funding for affordable housing.

Objective: Pursue and leverage funding for affordable housing.
Schedule: Annually and on-going.
Status:

2018

(Complete, on-going.) See responses to programs 2.a, “encourage housing for special needs households;” 2.c, “make provisions for multi-family housing amenities;” 2.q, “study best practices for Housing Choice Voucher acceptance;” 2.r, “encourage first-time homebuyer programs;” 3.m, “raise funds from a variety of sources;” and 3.o, “utilize Federal Grants Division funding.”

2017

(Complete, on-going.) See responses to programs 2.a, “encourage housing for special needs households;” 2.c, “make provisions for multi-family housing amenities;” 2.q, “study best practices for Housing Choice Voucher acceptance;” 2.r, “encourage first-time homebuyer programs;” 3.m, “raise funds from a variety of sources;” and 3.o, “utilize Federal Grants Division funding.”

2016

Currently implementing.

2015

Currently implementing.

Program. 3.m - Raise funds from a variety of sources.

Objective: Pursue and collect funding for affordable housing.
Schedule: Annually and on-going.
Status:

2018

(Complete, on-going). In 2018, the Marin Housing Trust Fund collected $460,572 in Affordable Housing Impact, In-Lieu Housing, Rental Housing Impact, and Jobs/Housing Linkage fees. The Federal Grants program allocated $1,735,302 in CDBG and HOME funds to the acquisition, preservation and rehabilitation of affordable housing. The County extended its commitment to support a pilot Landlord Partnership Program to stabilize the utilization rates of Marin Housing Authority’s Housing Choice Voucher program; it pledged an additional $450,000 of General Fund support through June 2020.

The County allocated $920,723 in General Fund dollars for rapid rehousing and permanent supportive housing programs for individuals and families experiencing homelessness. The Department of Health and Human Services also secured $4,496,522 in Continuum of Care funding, a $95,145 Emergency Solutions Grant for rapid rehousing, $882,824 in CalWORKS Housing Support Program rapid rehousing funding, $4,831,856 in Homeless Emergency Aid Program funding, and $508,836 in California Emergency Solutions and Housing funding.

In November 2018, the West Marin electorate voted to increase Transient Occupancy Taxes for that area by four percent. Half of the revenue generated by that initiative shall be earmarked to support the creation of affordable housing opportunities in West Marin.

2017

(Complete, on-going.) In 2017, the County Housing Trust Fund collected $244,955 in Affordable Housing Impact, In-Lieu Housing, Rental Housing Impact and Jobs/Housing Linkage fees. The Federal Grants program allocated $1,367,246 in CDBG and HOME funds to the acquisition, preservation and rehabilitation of affordable housing. The County continued its financial support of the pilot Landlord Partnership Program to stabilize the utilization rates of Marin Housing Authority’s (MHA) Housing Choice Voucher program.

The County allocated $986,874 in General Fund dollars to assist rapid rehousing and permanent supportive housing programs for individuals and families experiencing homelessness. The Department of Health and Human Services also secured $4,292,518 in Continuum of Care funding, an $181,586 Emergency Solutions Grant for rapid rehousing, and an $100,000 in funding for technical assistance through the No Place Like Home program. Health and Human Services also support nonprofit partner and homeless service provider Homeward Bound in the successful application for $1,567,065 in Partnership Health Care grant funding to support the creation of at least 15 units of permanent supportive housing.

2016

Currently implementing.

2015

Currently implementing.

Program. 3.n - Coordinate among project funders.

Objective: Serve as a coordinator among local funders.
Schedule: On-going.
Status:

2018

(Complete, on-going). Housing and Federal Grants Division staff actively participate in a committee of funders that evaluates potential acquisitions of existing housing and other opportunities for maximizing affordable housing stock throughout the County. Regular participants also include the City of San Rafael, Marin Community Foundation, Marin Housing Authority, and Tamalpais Foundation.

2017

(Complete, on-going.) Housing and Federal Grants Division staff actively participate in a committee of funders that evaluates potential acquisitions of existing housing and other opportunities for maximizing affordable housing stock throughout the County. Regular participants also include the City of San Rafael, Marin Community Foundation (MCF), Marin Housing Authority (MHA), and Tamalpais Foundation.

2016

Currently implementing.

2015

Currently implementing.

Program. 3.o - Utilize Federal Grants Division funding.

Objective: Pursue and leverage funding for affordable housing.
Schedule: Annually and on-going.
Status:

2018

(Complete, on-going.) In 2018, the County allocated $4,318,306 in HOME, CDBG, and County Housing Trust Fund loan and grant dollars including a bridge loan to address a last-minute financing gap for a 54-unit affordable housing development. The project was conditionally awarded $14,108,460 in Low-Income Housing Tax Credits in 2017 and was able to accept the award in June 2018 as a result of additional financial support from the County.

2017

(Complete, on-going.) In 2017, $1,157,863 of CDBG and HOME funding allocated to two affordable housing projects was used to leverage $14,020,151 of Low-Income Housing Tax Credits and 53 Project-Based Housing Choice Vouchers.

2016

Currently implementing.

2015

Currently implementing.