Frequently Asked Questions

Raul M. Rojas, County Purchasing Agent, Director, Public Works
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Airport

  • How low can aircraft fly?

    According to Federal Aviation Regulation: except when necessary for takeoff or landing, no person may operate an aircraft below the following altitudes:

    • Lower than minimum altitudes that will allow an aircraft to make an emergency landing without risking persons or property on the ground.
    • Over congested areas: congested area of a city, town, or settlement, or over any open air assembly of persons, an altitude of 1,000 feet above the highest obstacle within a horizontal radius of 2,000 feet of the aircraft.
    • Over other than congested areas: an altitude of 500 feet above the surface, except over open water or sparsely populated areas. In those cases, the aircraft may not be operated closer than 500 feet to any person, vessel, vehicle, or structure.
    • Helicopters: may be operated at less than the minimums prescribed in the paragraph b or c of this section if the operation is conducted without hazard to persons or property on the surface. In addition, each person operating a helicopter shall comply with any routes or altitudes specifically prescribed for helicopters by the Administrator.
  • What hours can aircraft fly into and out of the Marin County Airport Gnoss Field?

    Marin County Airport Gnoss Field is a 24-hour facility without a control tower.

  • Why can’t Marin County Airport Gnoss Field staff always identify each aircraft that disturbs me?

    Without the aircraft identification number, staff must try to recreate the situation that occurred during the time of the complaint. We do this by listening to the radio call for the Gnoss Field common traffic frequency and/or check the Flight Aware website for any aircraft that may be on an instrument flight plan. We then decipher the information collected to identify the aircraft that was in the vicinity of the caller’s home or business.

  • Are jets prohibited from operating at Marin County Airport Gnoss Field?

    Jet aircraft are allowed to and do operate out of Gnoss Field.

  • Why do aircraft fly over my home sometimes more, sometimes less?

    For safe operations, aircraft must take off and land into the wind. Wind directions change by season and as well as the time of the day. Pilots are asked to utilize the noise abatement runways and avoid residential areas as much as possible.

  • What does it mean when an aircraft is “outside Marin County Airport Gnoss Field control area”?

    Marin County Airport Gnoss Field is in Class G Airspace. This means that when aircraft are in this airspace, they are uncontrolled and have no specific requirements for communication into and out of Class G airspace. Aircraft that are not on an instrument flight plan or aircraft that land while the airport is unattended makes it unlikely that airport staff will be able to identify that aircraft, since no radio communication is required for Gnoss Field.

  • Are any aircraft exempt from the County Noise Abatement Procedures?

    Yes. They are:

    1. Aircraft operated by the United States of America or the state of California;
    2. Law enforcement, emergency, fire, or search and rescue;
    3. Aircraft used in support of emergency or emergency relief;
    4. Aircraft having to use the airport in a bona fide emergency for the preservation of life or property;
    5. Civil Air Patrol aircraft when engaged in actual search and rescue missions;
    6. Aircraft engaged in landings or takeoffs while conducting tests required by the Director of Airports or other authorized persons;
    7. Itinerant aircraft engaged in emergency medical evacuation or transport; and
    8. Aircraft engaged by or with the consent of the County Board of Supervisors for aerial exhibition.
  • Noise Complaints

    Marin County citizens who are disturbed by aircraft operations are encouraged to call the Airport at (415) 897-1754 during normal business hours (Mon-Fri, 8:00am – 5:00pm). The Airport manager is available to personally discuss your concerns. During non-business hours, you can leave a detailed message on our automated voice system.

    The investigation process is initiated with a timely call from a concerned citizen regarding an aircraft operation. The airport manager will then try to determine the aircraft involved, determine if the Noise Abatement Procedures were broken and if possible contact the pilot or aircraft involved, either in person or in writing.

    All complaints are compiled in a spreadsheet that is kept on file in the Airport Operations Office. The information is available for viewing upon request.

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Capital Projects

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Communications

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CUPA

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Disability Access Program

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FEMA Flood Information

  • Why is flooding dangerous?

    Floods are one of the most common hazards in the United States. Flooding can be local, impacting a neighborhood or community, or larger, affecting entire river basins and multiple states. However, all floods are not alike. Some floods develop slowly, sometimes over a period of days and weeks. But other kinds of flooding known as flash floods can develop quickly, sometimes in just a few minutes and without any visible signs of rain. Flash floods often have a dangerous wall of roaring water that carries rocks, mud, and other debris and can sweep away most things in its path. Overland flooding occurs outside a defined river or stream, such as when a levee is breached, but still can be destructive. Flooding can also occur when a dam breaks, producing effects similar to flash floods. Just a few inches of water from a flood can cause tens of thousands of dollars in damage. Each year, more deaths occur due to flooding than from any other severe weather related hazard.

    Be aware of flood hazards no matter where you live, but especially if you live in a low-lying area, near water or downstream from a dam. Even very small streams, gullies, creeks, culverts, dry streambeds, or low-lying area that may appear harmless in dry weather can flood. Every state is at risk from this hazard.

    For more information, see FEMA's flood web page.

  • What are my flood risks?

    Anywhere it rains, it can flood. A flood is a general and temporary condition where two or more acres of normally dry land or two or more properties are inundated by water or mudflow. Many conditions can result in a flood: hurricanes, overtopped levees, outdated or clogged drainage systems and rapid accumulation of rainfall.

    Just because you haven't experienced a flood in the past, doesn't mean you won't in the future. Flood risk isn't just based on history, it's also based on a number of factors: rainfall, river-flow and tidal-surge data, topography, flood-control measures, and changes due to building and development.

  • Why do I need to buy flood insurance?

    Standard homeowners insurance doesn't cover flooding. It is important to have protection from the floods associated with hurricanes, tropical storms, heavy rains and other conditions that impact the U.S.

    In 1968, Congress created the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) to help provide a means for property owners to financially protect themselves. The NFIP offers flood insurance to homeowners, renters, and business owners if their community participates in the NFIP. Participating communities agree to adopt and enforce ordinances that meet or exceed FEMA requirements to reduce the risk of flooding. Marin County participates in the NFIP.

    Find out more about the NFIP and how it can help you protect yourself by visiting Floodsmart.gov.

  • How do I find out if I am in a flood zone?

    You can contact the Land Development Division of the Department of Public Works for FEMA flood zone information. They can be reached by phone at (415) 473-3755, by email to the Department of Public Works Land Development Engineer, or in person in Room 308 at the Marin County Civic Center.

  • How do I obtain an elevation certificate?

    Elevation Certificates can only be completed by a licensed land surveyor, engineer, or architect who is licensed by the State to perform such functions. Copies of completed elevation certificates that have been submitted to the County are available at the Land Development office in Room 308 at the Marin County Civic Center.

  • What is a Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA)?

    The Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA) is defined by FEMA as the area that will be inundated by the flood event having a 1-percent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any given year (sometimes called the “100-year” flood). Flood-hazard maps or flood insurance rate maps (FIRMs) have been created by FEMA to show the flooding risk for your community, which help determine the cost of flood insurance. The lower the degree of risk, the lower the flood insurance premium. Properties in the SFHA may be subject to the mandatory flood insurance purchase requirements of the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). A good source of flood information is the Homeowner FAQs. You can also contact the Land Development Division of the Department of Public Works for FEMA flood zone information. They can be reached by phone at 415-473-3755, by email at DPWLandDevEngineer@MarinCounty.org, or in person in Room 308 at the Marin County Civic Center.

  • Can I change my flood zone determination?

    It depends on the reason for the change in flood zone. If a property owner thinks their property has been inadvertently mapped in a Special Flood Hazard Area or is now out of the flood zone due to elevating the structure or another reason, they may submit a request to FEMA for a Letter of Map Change or Amendment (LOMA). The requirements of the LOMA depend upon the reason for the requested change in flood zone and may require the applicant to hire a licensed surveyor or engineer. 

    If the request is granted, property owners may be eligible for lower flood insurance premiums, or the option to not purchase flood insurance.

    If an elevation certificate is required to support the change in flood zone, the elevations must be certified by a Registered Professional Engineer or Licensed Land Surveyor.

    A Letter of Map Change (LOMC) reflects an official revision/amendment to an effective Flood Insurance Rate Map. If the LOMC request is granted, property owners may be eligible for lower flood insurance premiums, or the option to not purchase flood insurance.

    A Letter of Map Amendment (LOMA) is a letter from FEMA stating that an existing structure or parcel of land that is on naturally high ground and has not been elevated by fill, would not be inundated by the base flood. Applicants can now use the Online LOMC, an Internet-based tool, to easily request a Letter of Map Amendment. The Online LOMC tool is available to any applicant who would like to submit a LOMC request directly to FEMA and does not require a surveyor or engineer to submit.

    A Letter of Map Amendment-Out As Shown (LOMA-OAS) is a determination made by FEMA for the property and/or buildings as to whether it is located with the SFHA. Only use this method if it is clear, visually, that the structure is not in the SFHA. Instructions are available online.

  • How do I change my flood zone determination?

    You can change your flood zone by filing a Letter of Map Amendment (LOMA) with FEMA.

  • What are some dangers of flooding?
    • Just a few inches of water from a flood can cause tens of thousands of dollars in damage.
    • Flooding can happen to anyone, anywhere.
    • A car can easily be carried away by just two feet of floodwater.
    • Each year more deaths occur due to flooding than from any other severe weather-related hazard.
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Flood Control

  • How do I determine if a channel or stormwater detention facility belongs to the District?

    The best way to find out if a particular facility is operated or maintained by the District is to email us or phone to (415) 473-6530.

  • What are the physical boundaries of the District?

    The District boundaries are congruent with the boundaries of the county. Within the District, eight zones were established for flood management.  These areas include Stinson Beach, Tamalpais Valley, Mill Valley, Bel-Air, Ross Valley, San Rafael Meadows, Santa Venetia and Novato.

  • What does the District do?

    The primary purpose of the District is to provide for the control of the flood and storm waters within its boundaries. This has largely been accomplished through the construction and maintenance of a variety of facilities including levees, channels, flood walls, silt basins, and pump stations, among others, and through annual maintenance of over 30 miles of channels, creeks and ditches.

  • Who do I call if a tree falls down in the creek?

    Please contact Public Works at (415) 473-6530 to report a downed tree in a creek.

  • How do I report a flooding emergency?

    Please call 911 to report life threatening situations and flooding emergencies.

  • Who should I contact if I wish to build or rebuild a fence adjacent or into a District right-of-way?

    Please email or phone us at (415) 473-6530 if you suspect that you may live next to a District right-of-way (e.g., easement, fee-tile parcel). We will provide you with any information you need to know prior to proceeding with your project.

  • Why is flooding a frequent problem in some neighborhoods?

    Flooding can occur just about anywhere, but does occur more frequently in certain prone locations especially areas closer to the Bay. A variety of factors can determine a particular neighborhood’s susceptibility to flooding including its proximity to waterways, its topography, and relative elevation to sea level.

  • Who is the governing body of the District?

    The District is governed by its Board of Supervisors whose members also sit as the Marin County Board of Supervisors. Each zone is also served by an advisory board made up of residents of the zone. Each advisory board provides recommendations to and serves at the pleasure of the Board of Supervisors.

  • Why was the District Created?

    The District was created to raise local funds for specialized flood control facilities and activities in specific areas of the county. These areas, called flood control zones, pay for their own infrastructure by receiving a small portion of the regular annual property tax revenue. Additional funding can be raised through the passage of special tax measures.

  • How can I report street flooding?

    Nuisance flooding that may be the result of a plugged street drain or an improperly functioning flood control facility can be reported to the Department of Public Works Roads Department via email or by phone to (415) 473-7388.

  • Where can I get sandbags?

    Here are some local vendors

    • Shamrock Materials (415) 455-1575
    • Martin Bros (415) 388-2025
    • Pini Hardware (415) 892-1577
    • Water Components (415) 451-1780
    • Goodman (415) 388-6233
  • What are watersheds, and how many are there in Marin County?

    A watershed represents a contiguous land area draining to a common watercourse or body of water. Watersheds come in many shapes and sizes and there are about two-dozen primary watersheds in the county. You can visit the Marin Watersheds website for more information about your watershed.

  • What is the Marin County Flood Control and Water Conservation District?

    The state legislature created the District in 1955 as a special district of the State of California. There are over two-thousand special districts in the state that provide a variety of services to the residents within their boundaries.

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Garage

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Land Use

  • Why is flooding dangerous?

    Floods are one of the most common hazards in the United States. Flooding can be local, impacting a neighborhood or community, or larger, affecting entire river basins and multiple states. However, all floods are not alike. Some floods develop slowly, sometimes over a period of days and weeks. But other kinds of flooding known as flash floods can develop quickly, sometimes in just a few minutes and without any visible signs of rain. Flash floods often have a dangerous wall of roaring water that carries rocks, mud, and other debris and can sweep away most things in its path. Overland flooding occurs outside a defined river or stream, such as when a levee is breached, but still can be destructive. Flooding can also occur when a dam breaks, producing effects similar to flash floods. Just a few inches of water from a flood can cause tens of thousands of dollars in damage. Each year, more deaths occur due to flooding than from any other severe weather related hazard.

    Be aware of flood hazards no matter where you live, but especially if you live in a low-lying area, near water or downstream from a dam. Even very small streams, gullies, creeks, culverts, dry streambeds, or low-lying area that may appear harmless in dry weather can flood. Every state is at risk from this hazard.

    For more information, see FEMA's flood web page.

  • What are my flood risks?

    Anywhere it rains, it can flood. A flood is a general and temporary condition where two or more acres of normally dry land or two or more properties are inundated by water or mudflow. Many conditions can result in a flood: hurricanes, overtopped levees, outdated or clogged drainage systems and rapid accumulation of rainfall.

    Just because you haven't experienced a flood in the past, doesn't mean you won't in the future. Flood risk isn't just based on history, it's also based on a number of factors: rainfall, river-flow and tidal-surge data, topography, flood-control measures, and changes due to building and development.

  • Why do I need to buy flood insurance?

    Standard homeowners insurance doesn't cover flooding. It is important to have protection from the floods associated with hurricanes, tropical storms, heavy rains and other conditions that impact the U.S.

    In 1968, Congress created the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) to help provide a means for property owners to financially protect themselves. The NFIP offers flood insurance to homeowners, renters, and business owners if their community participates in the NFIP. Participating communities agree to adopt and enforce ordinances that meet or exceed FEMA requirements to reduce the risk of flooding. Marin County participates in the NFIP.

    Find out more about the NFIP, find an agent, and assess your risk by visiting www.floodsmart.gov.

  • How do I find out if I am in a flood zone?

    You can contact the Land Development Division of the Department of Public Works for FEMA flood zone information. They can be reached by phone at 415-473-3755, by email at DPWLandDevEngineer@MarinCounty.org, or in person in Room 308 at the Marin County Civic Center.

  • What is an Elevation Certificate and how do I obtain one?

    An elevation certificate is a FEMA form that documents the actual building elevations especially the elevation of the finished first floor which is how FEMA sets their insurance rates or determines if a structure is in or out of a flood zone. Elevation Certificates can only be completed by a licensed land surveyor, engineer, or architect who is licensed by the State to perform such functions. The Land Use Division has been keeping copies of elevation certificates that have been submitted to the County since 1989. See our list of available elevation certificates and then contact the Land Development office in Room 308 at the Marin County Civic Center, at (415) 473-3755, or at DPWLandDevEngineer@MarinCounty.org for a copy.

  • What is a Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA)?

    The Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA) is defined by FEMA as the area that will be inundated by the flood event having a 1-percent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any given year (sometimes called the “100-year” flood). Flood-hazard maps or flood insurance rate maps (FIRMs) have been created by FEMA to show the flooding risk for your community, which help determine the cost of flood insurance. The lower the degree of risk, the lower the flood insurance premium. Properties in the SFHA may be subject to the mandatory flood insurance purchase requirements of the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). A good source of flood information is the Homeowner FAQs at https://www.fema.gov/national-flood-insurance-program-flood-hazard-mapping. You can also contact the Land Development Division of the Department of Public Works for FEMA flood zone information. They can be reached by phone at 415-473-3755, by email at DPWLandDevEngineer@MarinCounty.org, or in person in Room 308 at the Marin County Civic Center.

  • Can I change my flood zone determination?

    It depends on the reason for the change in flood zone. If a property owner thinks their property has been inadvertently mapped in a Special Flood Hazard Area or is now out of the flood zone due to elevating the structure or another reason, they may submit a request to FEMA for a Letter of Map Change or Amendment (LOMA). The requirements of the LOMA depend upon the reason for the requested change in flood zone and may require the applicant to hire a licensed surveyor or engineer.

    If the request is granted, property owners may be eligible for lower flood insurance premiums, or the option to not purchase flood insurance.

    If an elevation certificate is required to support the change in flood zone, the elevations must be certified by a Registered Professional Engineer or Licensed Land Surveyor.

    A Letter of Map Change (LOMC) reflects an official revision/amendment to an effective Flood Insurance Rate Map. If the LOMC request is granted, property owners may be eligible for lower flood insurance premiums, or the option to not purchase flood insurance.

    A Letter of Map Amendment (LOMA) is a letter from FEMA stating that an existing structure or parcel of land that is on naturally high ground and has not been elevated by fill, would not be inundated by the base flood. Applicants can now use the Online LOMC, an Internet-based tool, to easily request a Letter of Map Amendment. The Online LOMC tool is available to any applicant who would like to submit a LOMC request directly to FEMA and does not require a surveyor or engineer to submit.

    A Letter of Map Amendment-Out As Shown (LOMA-OAS) is a determination made by FEMA for the property and/or buildings as to whether it is located with the SFHA. Only use this method if it is clear, visually, that the structure is not in the SFHA. Instructions are available online.

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Maintenance

  • How do I contact you for service?

    You may call in your request 5 days a week from 8am to 5pm. You will be answered by a live voice during our regular hours.  After hours, you can follow the voicemail instructions to contact our duty pager.

  • Do you perform building inspections or offer advice on construction?

    No. We do have calls routed to us about zoning or permits. You will be directed to the Community Development Agency, (415) 473-6550.

  • How many Buildings are you responsible for?

    We maintain 50 buildings, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. We have a staff of 24 maintenance workers. We only maintain County owned buildings.

  • Once I make a call how long do I have to wait for service?

    We strive to make contact within 48 hours to either deal with the problem or at least diagnose it. Heating and cooling complaints are adjusted remotely via our Energy Management Computer. Sometimes the work requested will be assigned to after hour’s staff so it will not interfere with daily business. We do triage our work request and safety issues take precedent.

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MCSTOPPP

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Public Safety

  • Who do I call if a tree falls down in the creek?

    Please call Public Works at (415) 473-6530 to report a downed tree in a creek.

  • Why is flooding a frequent problem in some neighborhoods?

    Flooding can occur just about anywhere, but does occur more frequently in certain prone locations especially areas closer to the Bay. A variety of factors can determine a particular neighborhood’s susceptibility to flooding including its proximity to waterways, its topography, and relative elevation to sea level.

  • Where can I get sandbags?

    There are several vendors in our local area where you can find sandbags:

    • Shamrock Materials (415) 455-1575
    • Martin Bros (415) 388-2025
    • Pini Hardware (415) 892-1577
    • Water Components (415) 451-1780
    • Goodman’s (415) 388-6233
  • How do I report a flooding emergency?

    Please call 9-1-1 in life threatening situations and flooding emergencies.

  • How can I report street flooding?

    Nuisance flooding that may be the result of a plugged street drain or an improperly functioning flood control facility can be reported to the Department of Public Works Roads Department by calling (415) 473-7388.

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Purchasing

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Real Estate

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Roads

  • I would like to see additional signs, pavement markings or other traffic control devices on my street. Who should I contact?

    The Transportation and Traffic Division handles these requests.  They can be reached at (415) 473-3076.

  • Will the County take my/our private road into their system?

    The County maintained road system consists of approximately 420 miles of County roads. The roads within the County system vary greatly in width, alignment and surface. Due to budgetary constraints, the County cannot always perform all of the maintenance that we would like to on roads within the existing County road system.

    The County road budget comes primarily from State gas tax revenues. Taking additional miles of road into the system does not increase our revenue commensurate with the cost of maintaining the additional road mileage. If the County were to take additional roads into the system, the maintenance of the existing County roads would have to be scaled back. Therefore, it has been policy not to take additional roads into the County road system.

  • How do I report a graffiti issue?

    The Road Maintenance Division only removes graffiti that is racist or profane.  Graffiti fitting that description can be reported to (415) 446-4422.

  • Who is responsible for the maintenance of my road?

    The primary highways, such as Routes 1, 101 and 37 are maintained by the State (Caltrans).

    Many other primary and secondary roads are maintained by other agencies such as the County, various towns and cities and even the State or National Park Service.   

    There are also a number of private within unincorporated Marin County.   The California Civil Code requires the cost of maintenance of privately maintained roads to be shared equitably by the landowners benefiting from those roads.

  • Someone dumped trash on the side of the road. Who is responsible for picking it up?

    The Road Maintenance Division will remove large items that are an impediment to the travelling public.  Trash and or litter removal is not a service that we provide.  Other large pieces of debris in the right of way that do not pose an immediate risk to the travelling public will be removed when our schedule permits.

    Illegal dumping activities should be reported to the Marin County Sheriff’s Department and not the Road Maintenance Division.

  • Who is responsible for maintaining sidewalks and other frontage improvements?

    State law (Division 7, Part 3, Chapter 22 of the Streets and Highways Code [Sections 5600 and 5610]) requires property owners to maintain sidewalks, parking strips, curbs, retaining walls, and other such works between their property line and the street line.

    Property owners are required to maintain these frontage improvements such that they will not endanger persons or property or interfere with the public convenience in the use of those works or areas.

  • When will a particular street be resurfaced?

    Unless already scheduled as part of a current or pending project, the timing of major resurfacing work on any particular street is unknown. This is because the determination of including a street in a resurfacing project is most prudently made just prior to preparing the project’s construction contract documents. The determination is based on a number of factors, some of which change over time. These factors include street type and use, existing pavement condition, probable rate of future deterioration, funding availability, restrictions imposed by funding sources, the feasibility of resurfacing treatments, the potential to group work in close proximity, and the coordination of planned development and utility projects.

  • What is the County’s policy on tree trimming, brush trimming and mowing?

    The Road Maintenance Division seasonally trims trees, cuts brush and mows weeds for the purposes of maintaining safe sight distances and keeping vegetation from encroaching into the travelled way.  County road crews do not perform vegetative management for the purposes of fire abatement or for aesthetic reasons - only for keeping the roads clear of visual impediments and encroaching limbs and brush into traffic and bike lanes.

    It is County policy to not remove any trees within the County right of way unless recommended to do so via a report from a certified arborist.

  • Who is responsible for water leaks? Sewer leaks?

    Depending on which area you live in, the agency in which you pay your water or sewer bill is responsible for maintaining water and sewer lines.  Any leaks detected from these facilities need to be reported to the responsible water or sanitary agency.

    The Roads Maintenance Division does not maintain any water or sewer lines in the County of Marin.  The only pipes maintained by the Department of Public Works are for drainage.

  • Why are streets in seemingly decent condition being resurfaced before streets in obviously worse shape?

    The prioritization of street resurfacing work focuses on preventative maintenance with an emphasis on more heavily traveled roads; this is a requirement in order for the County to be eligible to receive State funding for street resurfacing work.

    Therefore, a moderately weathered and cracked arterial road might receive a relatively inexpensive slurry seal treatment or thin overlay before a badly deteriorated cul-de-sac is reconstructed. The rationale is that significantly more preventative maintenance treatment, such as slurry seal, can be applied for the cost of having to totally reconstruct the pavement. Preventative maintenance treatments extend the life of the pavement and prevent it from deteriorating to the point of having to be reconstructed at greater expense.

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Traffic

  • Who is responsible for bicycle facility maintenance?

    Facilities within the cities and towns are maintained by that particular agency.  In the unincorporated areas, on-road facilities such as bike lanes are maintained by the Public Works Roads Division (for 101 corridor/eastern area roads call (415) 473-7388; for west Marin roads, call (415) 446-4421).  Unincorporated area paved bike/multiuse paths are maintained as follows:

    Facility

    Routine
    (sweeping, litter removal, brush clearing)

    Major
    (pavement issues, resurfacing)

    Number

    Mill Valley - Sausalito Path Marin County Parks Marin County Parks (415) 473-6387
    Tennessee Valley Path Marin County Parks Marin County Parks (415) 473-6387
    Horse Hill Path Marin County Parks Caltrans (916) 654-5266
    Corte Madera Creek Path (Bon Air to Ross Marin County Parks Marin County Parks (415) 473-6387
    Cal Park Tunnel Path Marin County Parks Marin County Parks (415) 473-6387
    Pacheco Hill Path Marin County Parks Caltrans (916) 654-5266
    Stafford Lake Path Marin County Parks Marin County Parks (415) 473-6387
    Cross-Marin Bikeway (Taylor Park Path) California State Parks, Marin Municipal Water District California State Parks, Marin Municipal Water District (415) 945-1455
    Bolinas School Pathway Public Works Roads Division Public Works Roads Division See Description
  • Are count data available on bicyclists and pedestrians?

    Annual counts have been done since 2007 at various locations around the county, primarily in the urban areas.  Reports on these counts are available online.

  • How can I find out what’s being done to improve bicycle and pedestrian facilities in my community?

    View Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plans for the unincorporated area and cities in Marin, including corridor studies for selected locations.

    Get information on Bike Path, Bike Lane, and Pedestrian Projects.

  • How can I obtain a speed survey for an unincorporated county road?

    Call DPW- Traffic Operations Division at (415) 473-6528.

  • I’m interested in bicycling and/or walking. Where can I get more information?
  • Can the speed limit be lowered on a particular road?

    The requirements for setting speed limits are set forth in the California Vehicle Code.  Speed limits are not set arbitrarily.  Lowering a speed limit in hopes of slowing of traffic does not usually work.  Setting a speed limit without following the Vehicle Code guidelines could invalidate any citation issued by use of radar.

  • When a County traffic signal is malfunctioning (turned, out, knocked down, etc.), who do I contact?

    Call DPW's Traffic Signal Contractor, Republic ITS at 1-800-544-4876.

  • Which traffic signals does Marin County maintain?

    The Traffic Engineering division maintains the following traffic signals:

    • College Avenue (pedestrian crossing at College of Marin)
    • Donahue Street @ Terners Drive, Marin City
    • Lucas Valley Road @ Las Gallinas Avenue (Marinwood area)
    • Lucas Valley Road @ Miller Creek Road (Marinwood area)
    • Redwood Highway Frontage Road @ Seminary Drive (Strawberry area)
    • Redwood Highway Frontage Road @ Belvedere Drive (Strawberry area)
    • Sir Francis Drake Blvd. @ Eliseo Drive(Greenbrae area)
    • Sir Francis Drake Blvd. @ La Cuesta Drive(Greenbrae area)
    • Sir Francis Drake Blvd. @ El Portal (Greenbrae area)
    • Sir Francis Drake Blvd. @ Bon Air Road(Greenbrae area)
    • Sir Francis Drake Blvd. @ Wolfe Grade (Kentfield area)
    • Sir Francis Drake Blvd. @ Laurel Grove Avenue(Kentfield area)
    • Sir Francis Drake Blvd. @ College Avenue(Kentfield area)
    • Sir Francis Drake Blvd. @ Elm Avenue(Kentfield area)
  • I live in an unincorporated area of Marin County and I noticed a street light not working at night. Who can I call to have it repaired?
    Call DPW's Streetlight Contractor, Seimens at 1-800-LIGHTSON (1-800-544-4876).
  • How can I report speed violations or obtain speed enforcement?

    Contact the California Highway Patrol (CHP).

  • How can I request that a radar trailer be posted by a county road?

    Submit your request to DPW:

    Department of Public Works
    Traffic Operations Division
    P.O. Box 4186
    San Rafael, CA 94913

    Your request will be evaluated and you will be informed if it can be justified and approved by Marin County, DPW.

  • How will the SMART train affect my community?

    Visit the SMART website.

  • How can I get speed bumps or other traffic calming devices installed on my county road?

    Speed humps are considered only as a last resort where there are no other viable alternatives or where impacts would be restricted to the residents of that street only, such as on a cul-de-sac.  The County has a speed hump policy which allows for installation of speed humps on single streets only.  More than 67% of the surrounding properties (owners or occupants, one response per property), as defined by the Department of Public Works Traffic Engineering Section, must support the installation of speed humps.  A petition that includes a discussion of the pros and cons of speed humps will be distributed by Public Works and circulated to neighborhood proponents upon receipt of a Neighborhood Action Request Form.

    A minimum of 7 neighborhood proponents must sign the Neighborhood Action Request Form to initiate a request for a neighborhood petition. County Fire, Sheriff and California Highway Patrol will review all proposed speed hump installations prior to construction. 

    Advantages

    1. Speed humps have been documented to effectively lower speeds when properly installed.
    2. Residents typically support them and are willing to put up with the negative impacts discussed under “Disadvantages.”
    3. They can effectively reduce traffic volumes by encouraging drivers to use other routes.  Note that this can be seen as a negative impact by those living near the alternate routes.
    4. Lower speeds may improve pedestrian and bicycle safety.
    5. Speed humps are relatively inexpensive compared to other physical traffic calming measures such as traffic circles, road narrowing and the creation of mid-block cul-de-sacs.  They cost approximately $2,600.00 to install (including signing and striping and some engineering) and $250.00 per year to maintain.
    6. They can give the public a sense of involvement and an ability to affect the speeding in their neighborhood.
    7. Speed humps reduce the need for police enforcement of speeds.

    Disadvantages

    1. Speed humps have a documented negative impact on the response time of emergency vehicles (up to a 10-second delay per hump). 
    2. They can cause loose objects to be thrown around in an ambulance, fire truck or other vehicle if crossed at too high of a speed.
    3. They can be controversial.  While many support them, there are residents who dislike them.  A few agencies have reported having to remove them after a large amount of complaints.
    4. Speed humps cause an increase in noise due to slowing and accelerating vehicles.
    5. They cause a slight increase in gasoline consumption and emissions.
    6. They can cause discomfort for people with certain ailments such as back problems.
    7. They can divert traffic onto neighboring streets, thus transferring a traffic problem to others.
    8. Some of the public will typically find the humps and the associated signs and pavement markings aesthetically unpleasing.
  • Does the County of Marin do traffic counts?

    The Traffic Engineering division does obtain traffic counts for some of the roads in the unincorporated areas of Marin County. Call (415) 473-6528 to determine if traffic counts are available for the roads you are interested in.

  • Where can I find traffic forecasts?

    Traffic forecasts can be found on the following sites:

    San Francisco Gate traffic forecast information.

    Traffic 511 traffic forecast information.

  • Who do I contact regarding Traffic Safety?

    Questions about traffic safety in the unincorporated areas of Marin County, call (415) 473-6528.

  • Who do I contact if a traffic sign or striping in my unincorporated neighborhood is missing, damaged, etc.?

    Call the Department of Public Works (DPW) Sign Shop at (415) 446-4422.

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Waste Management

  • My garbage was not picked up. What can I do?

    You'll need to contact your garbage collection provider.  If you don't have their contact information handy, please visit the 'Who's My Hauler' section of the Zero Waste Marin website.

  • Where can I take bottles and cans for refund?

    Please visit the Zero Waste Marin website for our online recycling guide.

  • What can I put in my organics/composting cart?

    There are several companies that service Marin County and what you can place in your cart may depend upon which company serves your area.  For a list of companies and what they allow, please visit the 'Who's My Hauler' section of the Zero Waste Marin website.

    Although we try to keep our information as current as possible, if you have any questions or aren't sure whether the item you wish to put in your green waste container is acceptable, please contact your recycling provider. 

  • Where can I take household hazardous waste?

    Marin County has two drop off facilities, one in Marin and one in Novato.  Information detailing what constitutes hazardous waste may be found in this pdf or you may phone one of the facilities.

    Marin Household Hazardous Waste Facility
    565 Jacoby St.
    San Rafael

    Residential:  (415) 485-6806
    Business:  (415) 485-5549

    Commercial Customers: Tuesday & Wednesday, by appointment only
    Residential Customers: Tuesday - Saturday, 8am - 3:30pm. Call ahead for details.

    Visit Marin Household Hazardous Waste Facility's website

    Novato Household Hazardous Waste Facility
    7576 Redwood Blvd.
    Novato

    Residential:  (415) 892-7344
    Business:  (415) 892-6395

    The Facility is open on the first and third consecutive Sundays and Mondays of each month from 8:30am - 1:30pm. Certain businesses may dispose of hazardous wastes for a fee.  Call for more information.

    If you need information about hazardous waste collection, please phone one of the following numbers:

    All of Marin except Novato:

    Residential: (415) 485-6806
    Businesses: (415) 485-5648

    In Novato call:

    Residential: (415) 892-4177
    Businesses: (415) 892-6395

  • Where can I take garbage and recycling?

    The Marin Resource Recovery Center (MRRC) is open 7 days a week on the following schedule.

    Monday through Saturday - 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
    Sunday - 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

    The MRRC is located at 565 Jacoby Street, San Rafael and can be reached by phone at (415) 485-5646.

    For additional information and the types of materials which are accepted at the center, please visit the Marin Sanitary website.  You will find a link to MRRC in the left-hand column under Marin Sanitary Service.

    The Redwood Landfill and Recycling Center is located at the following address:

    8950 Redwood Highway
    PO Box 793
    Novato, CA 94945
    Phone: (415) 892-2851
    Scale House: ext. 33

    Facility Hours
    Mon - Fri: 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.
    Sat: 8 am to 3:30 p.m.
    Sun Closed

    The facility is closed to the public the following holidays:
    Memorial Day
    Independence Day
    Labor Day
    Thanksgiving Day
    Christmas Day
    New Year's Day

    If you would like more information including directions to the facility and rates, please visit their website.

  • Is there recycling information for Marin online?

    Yes, Zero Waste Marin and Marin Green Guide offer a number of recycling and reuse resources.

  • Where can I take paint?

    Paint is considered hazardous waste so you'll need to take it to one of the household hazardous waste drop-off facilities.

    Marin Household Hazardous Waste Facility
    565 Jacoby St.
    San Rafael

    Residential:  (415) 485-6806
    Business:  (415) 485-5648

    Commercial Customers: Monday & Tuesday, by appointment only
    Residential Customers: Thursday - Saturday, 8am - 3:30pm. Call ahead for details.

    Novato Household Hazardous Waste Facility
    7576 Redwood Blvd.
    Novato

    Residential:  (415) 892-7344
    Business:  (415) 892-6395

    The Facility is open on the first and third consecutive Sundays and Mondays of each month from 8:30am - 1:30pm. Certain businesses may dispose of hazardous wastes for a fee.  Call for more information.

  • Where can I properly dispose of surplus or expired pharmaceuticals or needles/sharps?

    There are a number of FREE drop-off locations that accept home generated Sharps and Pharmaceuticals.  But please be aware that not every facility takes Pharmaceutical Waste so you'll need to take that type of waste to an appropriate location as listed below.

    Pills should be dumped into a baggie as this helps us reduce the volume of waste materials.

    If you are disposing of controlled substances, you'll need to take them to the Novato Police Department, the Twin Cities Police Authority or the Mill Valley Police Department as they are the only agencies that accept these kinds of substances.

    This program is not intended for professionally generated medical waste.

    City of Sausalito Police Dept. - Pharmaceutical Waste ONLY
    29 Caledonia St., Sausalito
    415-289-4170

    Golden Gate Pharmacy - Pharmaceutical Waste ONLY
    1525 E. Francisco Blvd., San Rafael
    (415) 455-9042

    Jack's Drug Store - Sharps AND Pharmaceutical Waste - Sharps AND Pharmaceutical Waste
    121  Tunstead, San Anselmo
    (415) 454-1451

    Lucky's Pharmacy - Sharps AND Pharmaceutical Waste
    570 Magnolia, Larkspur
    (415) 924-6738

    Marin Aids Project - Sharps ONLY
    910 Irwin Street, San Rafael
    (415) 457-2487

    Marin Medical Pharmacy - Sharps AND Pharmaceutical Waste - Sharps AND Pharmaceutical Waste
    750 Las Gallinas, San Rafael
    (415) 479-1930

    Marin Recycling Center - Sharps ONLY
    Open Tuesday through Saturday - 8:00am - 3:30pm
    565 Jacoby Street, San Rafael
    (415) 485-6806

    MCC Pharmacy- Sharps ONLY
    3110 Kerner Blvd., San Rafael
    (415) 755-2514

    Mill Valley Police Department - Pharmaceutical Waste ONLY
    One Hamilton Drive, Mill Valley
    (415) 389-4100

    Novato Community Hospital Laboratory - Sharps ONLY
    180 Rowland, Novato
    (415) 209-1420

    Novato Police Department - Pharmaceutical Waste ONLY
    909 Machin Avenue, Novato
    (415) 897-4361

    Pharmaca Integrative Pharmacy - Sharps ONLY
    230 E. Blithdale, Mill Valley
    (415) 388-6354

    Pharmaca Integrative Pharmacy - Sharps ONLY
    7514 Redwood Blvd, Novato
    (415) 892-3722

    Ross Valley Pharmacy - Sharps AND Pharmaceutical Waste - Sharps AND Pharmaceutical Waste
    2 Bon Air Road, Larkspur
    (415) 924-2454

    Safeway Pharmacy - Sharps ONLY
    1 Camino Alto, Mill Valley
    (415) 388-2701

    Safeway Pharmacy - Sharps ONLY
    110 Strawberry Village #100, Mill Valley
    (415) 360-9020

    Safeway Pharmacy - Sharps ONLY
    5720 Nave Drive, Novato
    (415) 881-9260

    Safeway Pharmacy - Sharps ONLY
    950 Las Galinas, San Rafael
    (415) 472-8221

    Sheriff's Office/Coroner's Office - Pharmaceutical Waste ONLY
    3501 Civic Center Drive, Room 241, San Rafael
    (415) 473-6043

    Twin Cities Police Authority-Pharmaceutical Waste Only
    250 Doherty Drive, Larkspur
    (415) 927-5150

    Walgreens - Sharps ONLY
    227 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley
    (415) 380-8402

    Walgreens - Sharps ONLY
    820 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Anselmo
    (415) 482-0191

    Walgreens - Sharps ONLY
    830 Third Street, San Rafael
    (415) 455-9919

    West Marin Pharmacy - Sharps AND Pharmaceutical Waste
    4th & A Street, Pt. Reyes Station, CA
    (415) 663-1121

    Kaiser Permanente

    97 San Marin Drive, Novato - Sharps ONLY
    (415) 899-7563

    1033 Third Street, San Rafael - Sharps ONLY
    (415) 482-6904

    99 Montecello Road, San Rafael - Sharps ONLY
    (415) 444-2980

  • What can I put in my recycling cart?

    There are several companies that service Marin County and what you can place in your cart may depend upon which company serves your area.  For a list of companies and what they allow, please visit the 'Who's My Hauler' Zero Waste Marin website.

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